War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0751 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

guard, if you think necessary; but with ten men no one can escape. Whatever may happen, Molineux says he is prepared. Answer.

E. UPTON,

Brevet Major-General.

ATLANTA, May 13, 1865.

Major-General WILSON:

Everything will be in readiness. How many are there in the party, and at what time may we expect them? Has the train the road to itself? If so, it should arrive at 1 a. m. General Alexander reports that Wofford is turning over some fine horses at Resaca or Kingston. Cannot something be done to secure them for the division? We have no money here, but can get it at Augusta. I think the public interests demand that I shall go. I will not return demoralized.

E. UPTON,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. CAV. CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL, Macon, Ga., May 13, 1865.

Colonel W. COOPER,

Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, Commanding Post of Albany:

COLONEL: I have the honor to send herewith a number of paroles (blanks) for officers and men belonging to Johnston's and Lee's armies. The general commanding directs that you appoint an officer to act as provost-marshal, with the authority to sign and issue paroles. Paroles will be made out in single copies and a register kept giving name, rank, regiment, State, and branch of service, which will be sent to this office. Jeff. Davis and family were captured by Colonel Pritchard, Fourth Michigan Cavalry, seventy miles southeast of this place, at daybreak on the 10th. They arrived at this place 4 o'clock this p. m., and took their departure for Washington this evening.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. H. KNEELAND,

Captain and Provost-Marshal.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, Eastport, [May] 13, 1865. (Via Johnsonville 15th.)

Major-General THOMAS:

I send dispatches to-day from General Canby. Shall have telegraphic communication with Corinth this evening, and shall continue to repair the wires south toward Mobile until I meet the repairers of General Canby; also send a party east toward Decatur until I meet the workmen from Decatur. Many bands are surrendering here under your order, among them one of the worst, Burt Hayes. I learn a Mr. Chandler, calling himself a captain, a brother-in-law of Fielding Hurst, is levying contributions upon the citizens of McNairy County, Tenn., amounting to $50,000. Hurst has already taken about $100,000 out of West Tennessee in blackmail when colonel of the Sixth [Tennessee] Cavalry (Union). What shall I do with Chandler, if he reports to me as ordered? If he does not report, shall I treat him as an outlaw?

EDWD. HATCH,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.