War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0727 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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dispatch just received from Brigadier General G. L. Andrews, my provost-marshal-general, chief commissioner for receiving the paroles of General Richard Taylor and his command, and now at Meridian, Miss.:

General Forrest reports to General Taylor that Roddey's command is in North Alabama and cannot get them to Gainesville. I respectfully recommend that the commanding officer U. S. forces at Decatur, Ala., be appointed commissioner to parole Roddey's command, and other troops in North Alabama, to report to me for instructions. General Taylor will appoint General Roddey.

E. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL HEADQUARTERS ARMY AND DIVISION FIELD ORDERS,

OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 60. Mobile, Ala., May 11, 1865.

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2. On the arrival of Brigadier-General Hawkins' division of colored infantry at Mobile the Seventh Massachusetts and Eighteenth New York Batteries will be relieved from duty with the same, the former rejoining the First Division, Thirteenth Army Corps, the latter the siege train, the commanding officer reporting to the chief of ordnance and artillery of this army and division.

3. Company A, First Missouri Light Artillery, is hereby assigned to the division of colored infantry commanded by Brigadier General John P. Hawkins, and will be reported to him on his arrival in this city.

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By order of Major General E. R. S. Canby:

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SELMA, May 11, 1865.

Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN:

A large and important meeting of the citizens of Dallas County assembled here yesterday and passed a resolution requesting the Governor of Alabama to call the Legislature together with a view of the State resuming her former position in the Union. Judge Byrd, an influential citizen, made a short address, in which he said the war had decided two questions, secession, and slavery, and both adversely to the South. He counseled conciliation and moderation, and said it greatly depended on the generosity and magnanimity of the victors whether conciliation and harmony would be permanent and substantial. These are the sentiments of the people generally hereabouts.

C. C. ANDREWS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

POST OF DEMOPOLIS, ALA., May 11, 1865.

OFFICER IN COMMAND OF U. S. FORCES AT SELMA, ALA.:

SIR: You will greatly oblige me and at the same time subserve the public interests and enable me to fulfill the agreement entered into between Generals Canby and Taylor if you will send to this place a