War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0719 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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Altamaha, the supplies necessary for my command ought to be got to Augusta; from there I can bring them by rail. With money I could purchase forage for twenty or twenty-five days longer in Southwestern Georgia. At present my command is distributed over a wide area of country, stretching from the Etowah to Tallahassee, and, subsisting by forced purchase upon the country, we may be able thereby to get a few days' grain ahead. Provisions are already arriving from Savannah. I have fifteen days' besides already here. Our horses are suffering for want of hay. The grass of this region is very hurtful to them, and but little corn fodder can be had. On the receipt of a letter from General Steedman, a few days ago, saying he had begun repairing the Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad, I began operations from this end. There is a bridge already framed for the Chattahoochee. I have 3,000 negro troops who could be put to work, and General Winslow thinks the whole road can be rebuilt in twenty days. It would do good to the cause of pacification to rebuild the road. Shall I continue the work? The Savannah and Ocmulgee cannot be relied upon for a great while. I can fill the wagon train with C. S. A. cotton. Besides that there are 50,000 bales in warehouse here claimed by private citizens. Shall I do anything with it? I have given the tithe stores not on the railroad to the poor and loaned them the C. S. A. horses, mules, and wagons. The quartermaster-general of the State and a prominent Union man are charged with the distribution. No perfectly reliable news of Mr. Davis' recent movements have been obtained. Colonel Betts, of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania, reports that he went through Fairplay, in Morgan County, on the 8th, 11 a. m. If this is true, he can scarcely escape. A son of John C. Breckinridge and one of James B. Clay were captured last night about eleven miles below here on the Ocmulgee. They had a letter from J. C. B., directing them to go to Fort Valley and remain there for a month. In the letter J. C. B. says to his friend, R. M. Thompson, "Should my friends ever know my part in the occurrences of the last three months, I venture to think it will give me an increased claim on their confidence and regard." The rebel cavalry which started with J. D. have all given themselves up; about 4,000 have already been paroled. Five thousand dollars of J. D.'s specie have been recovered by Captain Abraham.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

MACON, GA., May 11, 1865 - 8 p. m.

(Received 14th.)

Major-General THOMAS:

The sum of $ 5,000 in specie, which had been left by the rebels at Washington, is in the hands of the Fourth Division provost-marshal. Can it be used by the proper staff department for the purchase of eatables for the command? What shall I do with my three negro regiments; will the Government have them mustered into service? Nothing new in regard to the movements of Davis. Everybody is watching for him closely. I am quite certain the opening of the Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad would be a very potent assistant in the re-establishment of Georgia's relations with the loyal States. I shall continue the work till I hear from you again.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.