War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0634 KY., S.W.VA., TENN., N. & C.GA., MISS., ALA., & W.FLA.

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AUGUSTA, May 6, 1865.

Major-General WILSON:

Will you stand by me in using the name of the Secretary of War? I send this, as you may not have understood one paragraph in former dispatch, and that you may be conversant of the whole matter.

E. UPTON,

Brevet Major-General.

MACON, May 6, 1865.

Major-General UPTON,

Augusta, Ga.:

Don't use the Secretary's name at all, but yours or mine, and we will take the consequences together.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Macon, Ga., May 6, 1865-9 a.m.

Bvt. Major General E. UPTON,

Augusta, Ga.:

Go ahead, but put no price upon his head; offer simply for his apprehension and delivery and on the condition that the reward shall be paid out of the treasure to be captured with the fugitive. Lieutenant Yeoman, of Alexander's staff, has sent in from Greensborough substantially the same information that you have obtained. Catch Jeff. Davis if possible, and act as you think best.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Macon, Ga., May 6, 1865-3.15 p.m.

Bvt. Major General E. UPTON,

Augusta, Ga.:

There are 36,000 pounds of powder at Greensborough belonging to State of Georgia. Have it removed to Augusta as soon as it can be done, for storage.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY DIV., DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Athens, May 6, 1865-11 p.m.

Brevet Major-General UPTON,

Augusta:

GENERAL: I have the honor to send to you my acting assistant adjutant-general Captain McAllester, with a verbal communication from myself in regard to the status of Dibrell's division of cavalry, which is now lying at or near the pontoon bridge over the Savannah River at Petersburg, having escorted Jefferson Davis with the Confederate specie from Greensborough to that point. On reaching there, finding that my command had intercepted them on their way to the Trans-Mississippi Department, Dibrell concluded to surrender. His command, with some detachments of Duke's and Vaughn's brigades left with them, had