War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0615 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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you may not have received, were to parole all Confederate troops in your neighborhood, break up the army and destroy munitions of war, and then conduct your command to Decatur, Ala. General Sherman is now at Beaufort, N. C. He has just returned from Savannah and is going to City Point. The paroling of Johnston's army is completed.

Davis and his cabinet went south with a brigade of cavalry before Johnston's surrender. Have you heard anything of them?

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY DIV., DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Athens, Ga., May 5, 1865-4 p.m.

General WILSON,

Commanding Cavalry Corps, Macon:

My division [Stoneman's cavalry] has marched here from North Carolina under orders from Secretary of War to intercept Jefferson Davis and cabinet, who, with six millions of Confederate specie, are endeavoring to get to the Trans-Mississippi Department. My orders are if I can hear of Davis to follow him up to the ends of the earth if possible and never give him up. General Stoneman states in his order that the cavalry under him, as well as the other forces in the Department of the Cumberland, will, by direction of the Secretary of War, obey no orders unless emanating from General Grant or General Thomas. Also that hostilities will not cease until the President of the United States so proclaims to the world. I was informed of your whereabouts in order that I might communicate if possible. I have had track of Davis and his party all the way from Yorkville, S. C., where I was two days in his rear. By reaching Athens I have thrown my division in front of his cavalry escort, which consisted of Dibrell's two brigades, Ferguson's brigade, Duke's brigade, and a portion of Butler's division of Hampton's cavalry; in all, from 2,000 to 3,000 men. These forces are all evading the terms of Johnston's surrender, and endeavoring as armed organizations to reach the Trans-Mississippi Department, but their men are dropping off every day, and at Abbeville, S. C., on-last Davis decided to drop his cavalry escort and push on to Washington, Ga., there to take train by railroad to Atlanta or La Grange. I have position information to-day from one of his escort that he was at Washington, Ga., there to take train by railroad to Atlanta or La Grange. I have positive information to-day from one of his escort that he was at Washington on Wednesday at 9 a.m., and was about to take train for Atlanta with his cabinet and some generals. The specie was coming on to Washington to go by the same route. I have sent a battalion of Tenth Michigan to Madison, with directions to cut the railroad without destroying any bridge, so as to intercept the specie and Davis, if possible, and to communicate by courier with you at Macon. I would suggest that your forces in Alabama endeavor to intercept or pursue. I am sending by courier a cipher dispatch to you from General Thomas. Please let me hear from you.

WM. J. PALMER,

Colonel and Brevet Brigadier-General. Commanding Division.

MILLEDGEVILLE, May 5, 1865.

General WILSON, Macon:

The Governor has left on the train for Macon. He will be there at 5 p.m. Will you say to Scott that I cannot come over.

HENRY C. WAYNE,

Major-General.