War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0607 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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Cleveland, and claiming to be acting under Federal authority, and who had committed many outrages upon peaceable citizens in that vicinity.

I saw large numbers of prisoners paroled by General Wilson at Macon, and who all concurred in the statement that General Wilson was in occupation of the city when they left; that it had been surrendered to him, with Howell Cobb and G. W. Smith as prisoners; that Wilson was using the railroad from Macon to Savannah via Atlanta. One of them, an engineer, stated that he run the engine of the train which brought a number of Wilson's staff and escort from Macon to Atlanta, and they were going thence to Savannah. General Wofford informed me that the railroads from Atlanta to Savannah, and from Atlanta to Macon, are in running order; and several of the prisoners stated that General Wilson was engaged in repairing the direct road from Macon to Savannah at the time they left.

Colonel Woodall, with dispatches for General Wilson, was promptly and unhesitatingly forwarded by General Wofford, without even an inquiry as to the object of his mission. I saw, also, six or seven deserters from Dibrell's division, of Wade Hampton's cavalry corps. This division is escort to the President and cabinet of the Confederate States and their train. They stated that they had left near Charlotte on the 22nd [I think] from an apprehension that they would be taken along west of the Mississippi; that the understanding was that the whole concern was to cross the Mississippi to Texas; that certainly Davis, Breckinridge, and Burnett, whom they knew personally, were with them, and many others; that the escort, though nominally a division, was only some 700 or 800 men strong, and part of it disaffected; that the train consisted of some forty wagons, heavily loaded, and believed to contain the archives of the Confederate Government. They know nothing of any treasure being with it, though they stated that it was rumored among the men that there was; that there were several families with the train, mentioning specially the family of General Rains, whom they knew personally; the others they did not know.

The above is the substance of what I communicated, as I now remember. If on any point I have omitted anything which your memory recalls, I will be glad to add it.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LEWIS MERRILL,

Colonel, U. S. Volunteers.

DECATUR, ALA., May 4, 1865.

Brigadier General W. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Mead refuses to surrender his guerrillas north of the river on Paint Rock. Your order will be carried out, and they will at once be proceeded against as outlaws.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-General.

DECATUR, ALA., May 4, 1865-1 p.m.

Brigadier General W. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Colonel Norwood, from south side of river, sends communication offering to surrender on terms of Lee. Officers sent to receive the surrender.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-General.