War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0587 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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of the convention. Colonel Kelly will be careful that his operations do not conflict with those of Colonel Eggleston, First Ohio Cavalry, in command at Atlanta.

* * * *

By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, MACON, GA., Numbers 29.

May 3, 1865.

In pursuance of orders from the Secretary of War, a salute of 200 guns will be fired at noon to-morrow in honor of the victories gained by the armies under the command of Lieutenant-General Grant and the peace resulting to our country. Lieutenant Rodney, Fourth U. S. Artillery, is charged with the execution of this order.

By command of Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MI. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., May 3, 1865-2.30 p. m.

Major General E. UPTON. U. S. Army,

Augusta, Ga.:

Let me know as soon as you can in regard to the navigation of the Savannah River, and also when the troops of Johnston's army will begin to pass through Augusta, so that arrangements may be made at Atlanta and Macon for their subsistence.

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

AUGUSTA, May 3, 1865.

Major-General WILSON,

Commanding Cavalry Corps:

I arrived this morning. Have sent torpedo operators who laid the obstructions in the Savannah River down to remove them. Will take them four to six days. Will send communications to General Grover to-morrow morning by Captain Lamar, of General McLaws' staff. Atlanta, has rations enough, if the soldiers have not appropriated them, to supply the paroled men of Lee's and Johnston's armies. The citizens fear a disturbance should Wheeler's men pas this way, and it may be necessary for their protection, as well as the vast amount of Government property here, to have a dismounted force sent by rail to garrison the place while the troops are in transitu. Lee's army has mostly passed through. Many of Johnston's are passing across the river higher up in the direction of Washington. Shall I order supplies to this point from Savannah? There ought to be a sufficient amount accumulated here, in the event of the river falling, to hold out till the Central Railroad is repaired.

E. UPTON,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.