War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0462 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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AUGUSTA, April 25, 1865.

Major-General WILSON, U. S. Army:

Lieutenant Colonel G. A. Henry, jr., of General Johnston's staff, telegraphs me from Charleston, S. C., yesterday that he is on the way with orders from Major-General Sherman to suspend hostilities, and that he will make all possible haste.

B. D. FRY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

MACON, GA., Numbers 25.

April 25, 1865.

The provost-marshal of the Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi, will at once parole all officers and men captured in the Department of Tennessee and Georgia. The conditions of the parole require that the officers and men shall not serve against the United States of America, or give any information, or do any military duty whatever until regularly exchanged. The parole of the officers and soldiers taken at Macon will be binding, provided the capture of the city is held to be legal, and if it is not, the officers and men will be relieved from the obligation of the parole. The officers captured at Macon will be allowed to retain their side-arms and horses. Major-General Cobb having pledged himself to use his influence with the Confederate authorities to have the parole of the officers and men of Lieutenant-General Forrest's command recognized, they will also be paroled under the conditions that they are not to serve against the United States of America, or give any information, or do any military duty whatever until regularly exchanged as prisoners of war. The utmost dispatch will be used in making out paroles in order that the officers and men may proceed to their homes as soon as possible.

By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, FIRST DIV., CAVALRY CORPS,

MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., April 25, 1865.

Major E. B. BEAUMONT,

Asst. Adjt. General, Cavalry Corps, Mil. Div. of the Mississippi:

MAJOR: If not inconsistent with the views of the major-general commanding, I would respectfully, but most earnestly, request that Colonel J. H. Fannin, Thirty-seventh Georgia Reserves, who commanded at West Point after the death of General Tyler, be paroled and permitted to go to his home at La Grange, in this State, until regularly exchanged as a prisoner of war. Colonel Fannin is a gentleman of the highest character and standing, and I am satisfied that no power of the so-called Confederate Government could compel him to violate such a parole. His delicate health and peculiar situation of his family make such a favor particularly desirable to him.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. H. LA GRANGE,

Colonel, Commanding.