War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0427 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., April 21, 1865.

Colonel R. H. G. MINTY,

Commanding Second Division, Cavalry Corps:

COLONEL: A force of the enemy said to be 500 strong is reported across the river. General Wilson directs that you send a regiment over the bridge to bring it in.

By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

EASTPORT, April 21, 1865.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. Army:

The following order is respectfully forwarded for you information:

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS MAURY'S COMMAND, &C., Numbers 2.

Meridian, Miss., April 14, 1865.

1. Pursuant to instructions from the lieutenant-general commanding, all officer of the quartermaster's commissary, ordnance, and medical departments on duty at Mobile at the date of its evacuation, will report to the respective chiefs of their departments, and will turn over to them all Government property in their possession not required for immediate issue.

2. All officers lately on post duty at Mobile, and not properly reassigned, will report for orders to the inspector-general of the department at Meridian.

By command of Major General D. H. Maury:

D. W. FLOWERREE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

EDWARD HATCH,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS,

MILITARY DIVISION, OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Pulaski, Tenn., April 21, 1865.

Brigadier General W. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Cumberland:

I have the honor to invite the attention of the major-general commanding to the following statement of facts, submitted to me by a citizen, in whom I believe reliance may be placed: On Sunday, the 9th instant, three soldiers, Brewer, and Kiddy by name, with two Confederates, who would not show themselves, and cannot therefore be identified, belonging to a company of the Second Tennessee Mounted Infantry which is stationed at Clifton, came to the house of Mr. William Johnson, living on Sugar Creek, some eighteen or twenty miles southwest of this place, and demanded of his wife, he not being at home, $12,000. She told them she had no money, when they hung her and her daughter several times, completing their diabolical work by each of them outraging the person of Mrs. Johnson. From Johnson's house these men went to the house of John. D. Wade, Johnson's brother-in law, living in the same neighborhood, and by the same process of hanging and threats extracted $50 from him. From Wade's the scoundrels went to P. P. Powell's, where they repeated the operation of hanging upon him. From Powell's they went to John Guest's, whom they beat nearly to death, and upon his entreating one of them by name to spare has life they, finding they were known, killed him; three shots were put into his body. From Powell's they went to Dr. James McDougal's, at