War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0426 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS ., ALA., & W. FLA.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Raleigh, N. C., April 21, 1865.

General JAMES H. WILSON,

Commanding Cavalry, Division of the Mississippi, Macon, Ga.:

(Through General J. E. Johnston.)

GENERAL: A suspension of hostilities was agreed on between General Johnston and myself on Tuesday, April 18 at 12 noon. I want that agreement religiously observed, and you may release the generals captured at Macon, occupy ground convenient, and contract for supplies for your command, and forbear any act hostility until you hear or have reason to believe hostilities are resumed. In the meantime, it is also agreed the position of the enemy's forces must not be altered to our prejudice. You know by this time that General Lee has surrendered to General Grant the rebel Army of Northern Virginia, and that I only await the sanction of the President to conclude terms of peace coextensive with the boundaries of the United States. You will shape your conduct on this knowledge unless you have overwhelming proof to the contrary.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

After the above is telegraphed this original should be sent General Wilson as rapidly as possible.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS,

MACON, GA., Numbers 22.

April 21, 1865.

It is hereby announced to the Cavalry Corps of the Military Division of the Mississippi that an armistice has been agreed upon between General J. E. Johnston and Major General W. T. Sherman with a view to a final peace. The troops of the Cavalry Corps are ordered to refrain from further acts of hostility and depredations. Supplies of all kinds are to be contracted for and foraging upon the country will be discontinued. The officers of the Cavalry Corps will enforce, the strictest discipline in the commands. Guards will be established, private and public property respected, and everything done to secure good order. The brevet major-general commanding again takes great pleasure in commending the officers and men of the corps for their gallantry, steadiness, and endurance in battle and during the arduous marches to this place. He enjoins them to remember that the people in whose midst they are now stationed are their countrymen, and should be treated with magnanimity and forbearance, in the hope that, although the war which has just ended has been long and bloody, it may secure a lasting peace to our beloved country.

By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.