War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0377 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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KNOXVILLE, April 17, 1865.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

Telegram received. The necessary arrangements for the transportation of the [Fourth] Army Corps and its transportation by rail by brigades as directed will be made immediately.

A. J. MACKAY,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief Quartermaster.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, April 17, 1865.

Mr. W. J. STEVENS,

Superintendent Military Railroad, Nashville:

Have just received orders to concentrate the Fourth Corps at this place. I wish you to make arrangements with Colonel A. J. Mackay, chief quartermaster, Army of the Cumberland, for the necessary transportation, so as to crowd the troops and animals as little as possible. Address Colonel Mackay at Knoxville.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, April 17, 1865.

Mr. L. H. EICHOLTZ,

Chief Engineer Military Railroad, &c., Greeneville:

Continue your repairs to Carter's Depot. Call on General Tillson for the necessary guard until the return of General Stoneman, when you will call on him. The Fourth Corps has been ordered to concentrate at this place, there being no longer any formidable force in West Virginia or West North Carolina.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[APRIL 17, 1865.-For General Orders, Numbers 70, War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, extending the military lines of the United States, see Vol. XLVI, Part III, p. 809.]

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND, Numbers 22.

Nashville, Tenn., April 17, 1865.

Whereas, certain rebels, former residents of the State of Tennessee and other portions of the Department of the Cumberland, having cast their lot with the Southern Confederacy in rebellion against the Government of the United States,and countenanced that rebellion by their presence within its limits, and frequently by their active assistance during the present war, and having recently become convinced that all attempts to establish such Confederacy must and have proved vain and futile, and now wishing to secure themselves in the full possession of their property and all the rights of good and loyal citizens of the United States, have returned within the Federal lines and taken the amnesty oath, at places sometimes remote from their former places of residence,and where they are known, without the knowledge and consent of the