War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0239 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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This communication will be handed you by Captain Hosea, of my staff, who is authorized to enter into the necessary arrangements, and who, if granted, can explain more fully my views.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, SELMA, ALA., No. 14.

April 5, 1865.

I. The system of scouts is hereby abolished in the Cavalry Corps. Military Division of the Mississippi, and all men detailed as scouts will immediately be returned to their regiments. No more scouts will be allowed except by special permission from these headquarters.

II. Each division commander is hereby authorized to organize detachments, not to exceed forty men, for special service. The men will be selected for gallantry, and general good conduct. They will be armed and equipped, and every effort should be made to render them the model soldiers of the corps.

III. Division commanders will at once send in reports of the number of guns, prisoners, and flags taken up to date, the amount of public property destroyed, including foundries, iron-works, collieries, railroad bridges and trestle-work, locomotives, station houses, &c.

By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION,

April 5, 1865.

Major E. B. BEAUMONT:

The command marched forty miles yesterday, and reached the train at this point near Randolph. Everything all right except my horses, which are nearly worn out. I don't know where General Upton is, and will march back toward Selma with the train until I meet him. Nothing heard from Croxton's whereabouts, except that some of his stragglers who were in the fight came into Elyton and joined the train. I think forces of the enemy are on both our flanks, but as soon as the train passes Plantersville it will be safe, without doubt, and I will have no trouble in getting it there.

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General.

I have just been talking with one of Croxton's sergeants. He says that when he left Croxton was in column ready for a run, with all his led stock turned loose. I think Croxton is all safe some place. Where that some place may be I can form no opinion. I will send out a party toward Elyton to see if they can learn anything further. These men from Croxton confirm the previous reports as to the strength of the enemy. They place it at 4,000. I will march on toward Selma until I hear from Upton or receive some orders from him.

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General.

The train burnt the railroad bridge across Cahawba River.