War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0225 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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order of General Canby to urge these regiments forward, but General Washburn refuses to allow them to go. Will your order these regiments to comply with General Canby's orders? Please answer me at Louisville.

C. J. WALKER,

Captain, Second U. S. Cav., Special Inspector of Cavalry, Dept. of the Gulf.

The following is General Thomas' reply:

HEADQUARTERS,

Nashville, Tenn., April 1, 1865.

Captain C. J. WALKER,

Second U. S. Cavalry:

Your telegram received. The cavalry mentioned was reported to me by General Washburn as belonging to the District of West Tennessee, and of course I cannot let them go.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

As General Thomas has refused to allow this cavalry to go I do not see that I can do anything in the matter. I shall therefore from this date avail myself of the leave of absence granted me by paragraph 3, Special Orders, No. 80, headquarters Department of the Gulf. If I can be of any further service in this matter, please address me at Richmond, Ky.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. J. WALKER,

Captain Second U. S. Cav., Special Inspector of Cav., Dept. of the Gulf.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER,

New Orleans, La., April 4, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Asst. Adjt. General, Military Division of West Mississippi:

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit to your consideration the following report of information received at this office this 4th day of April, 1865: Bridgeport, on the Alabama River, is at an extreme eastern bend of that stream, and about as near the Pensacola and Montgomery Railroad as any point on that river. The bluff is very high and commands a long view both up and down, and is directly opposite the celebrated canebrake region, which abounds in subsistence of all kinds. From Bridgeport to Allenton (on said railroad) are very large plantations, on all of which are considerable amounts of cotton belonging to the Confederate States Government, among which are the following: Wilmer's George's, Smith's, Young and Brothers, Jerry Fail's, Judge Cochrane's, Doctor Dortch's, Thomas Beck's, the Sterrett plantation, now Walter Pait's, and Frank Boykin's, nearly all of which are in the vicinity of Camden, Wilcox County, Ala. In the immediate neighborhood of Allenton are also considerable, which may have been removed since the commencement of General Steele's movements. In all this section are large qualities of subsistence, and considerable stock, and wagons sufficient to bring off a large amount of the cotton. The roads from Allenton or Sparta to Camden are very bad in rainy weather. West and southwest of Camden are also large supplies of Government, cotton on the plantations of the farmers, who are very wealthy, and all of which is the property of the Confederate States Government. The place referred to is called Canton Benton, but is not quite so near the railroad as the places previously mentioned. The distances from the railroad to these plantations vary from mine to thirty miles. The

15 R R-VOL XLIV, PT II