War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0203 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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examined. Large quantities of these goods are sold to rebel soldiers, if not nearly all. Many wagon trains of cotton are passing from Mississippi to West Tennessee and Kentucky, to be sold as productions of those States and avoid the Government tax of 25 per cent. If there is a probability of making this a post of any prominence it would be well to mount a few heavy guns; the enemy would believe the occupation permanent, should that be the impression you wish to give. Some of the Illinois regiments in my command are receiving more recruits than their organizations are entitled to. Can an order be issued transferring the surplus men to regiments of other States?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD HATCH,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

HUNTSVILLE, April 3, 1865-11.30 a.m.

General WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff:

Major POLK:

The following dispatch just received from Athens, 3rd, to General Stanley. A citizen handed me, this morning, the following, picked up on the Florence road, three miles from here:

"MONTICELLO, ALA., March 30, 1865.

"Captain McDONALD:

"Scout the country close and make a faithful and ready report, as we design to cross about Gouldsville [Guntersville?] very shortly on our way to Knoxville to join Longstreet, who is now near that place with a very considerable force. Johnston has whipped Sherman, and Grant has been repulsed from before Richmond with frightful loss. Wilson's raid has been beaten by the combined forces of Forrest and Buford and nearly all taken prisoners, with the entire loss of their wagon train.

"Very respectfully,

"P. D. RODDEY,

"Brigadier-General."

The envelope was indorsed by Lieutenant-Colonel Curry, commanding at Danville.

F. S. LOVELL,

Colonel, Commanding.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-General.

HUNTSVILLE, April 3, 1865-11.30 a.m.

General WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff:

Major POLK:

Following dispatch just received from Colonel Lovell:

"ATHENS, 3rd.

"Brigadier-General GRANGER:

"The dispatch of this morning was intended to be directed to you. I hear of considerable of Confederate scouting between here and Elk River. I think it not unlikely that Roddey's dispatch was intended [to fall] into my hands, and that we may possibly expect an attack on the railroad in this direction. I will endeavor to be prepared.

"F. S. LOVELL,

"Colonel, Commanding."

I will leave in ten minutes for Athens, and will forward from that post any information I receive. Don't now place any importance to report referred to.

R. S. GRANGER,

Brigadier-General.