War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0165 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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the fire from the forts., The approaches and parallels are to be widened out and systematically connected all around the line, so as to be able to move, under cover, bodies of troops from one point to another. Emplacements for the gathering of columns must be properly arranged at intervals, and everything prepared to make an assault successful, if it should be ordered.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. JOS. OSTERHAUS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

(Same to Major General A. J. Smith, commanding Sixteenth Army Corps.)

HDQRS. ARMY AND DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, March 31, 1865.

Major-General GRANGER:

Almost every hour in the day telegraph wires are cut or otherwise interfered with by men of our own army, either through malice or ignorance. The injury to the service by this practice is apparent. Be pleased to issue the most stringent orders on this subject.

By order of Major-General Canby:

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. ARMY AND DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI, March 31, 1865.

Captain JOHN C. PALFREY,

Chief Engineer, Thirteenth Army Corps:

Captain Mack, Eighteenth New York Battery, has arrived and been ordered to report to General Granger.

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.

MARCH 31, 1865.

Captain J. C. PALFREY,

General Granger's Headquarters:

Will send you 500 men from here at sunrise to-morrow.

M. D. McALESTER,

Captain and Chief Engineers.

HEADQUARTERS, &C., March 31, 1865.

Captain LUDWICK,

Headquarters Thirteenth Army Corps:

Ascertain from Lieutenant Denicke what has become of the low steamer or covered barge seen opposite his station this morning. Answer as soon as possible.

S. M. EATON,

Captain and Chief Signal Officer, Mil. Div. of the Mississippi.