War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0136 KY.,S. W. VA.,TENN.,N. & C. GA.,MISS.,ALA., & W. FLA.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Elyton, Ala., March 30, 1865-2 p. m.

Brigadier-General CROXTON,

Commanding First Brigade, First Division:

GENERAL: I have just received the following order from headquarters Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi.* In compliance with the above order you will march with your brigade immediately and report in person to General wilson for instructions.

E. M. MCCOOK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding First Division, Cavalry Corps.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Cahawba River, March 30, 1865.

Brigadier General ELI LONG,

Commanding Second Division, Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: Go into camp at the first good place after you receive this. There is no good camp near the river to be found to-night. You will march to-morrow morning at daylight.

By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Elyton, Ala., March 30, 1865.

Brevet Major-General UPTON,

Commanding Fourth Division, Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: Your note of last evening is received. The pontoon is far behind, not yet across the Locust Fork, and you must devise some means for crossing the corps over the Cahawba. I will join you with the whole command except one brigade (which I shall send to Tuscaloosa) as soon as I possibly can. McCook and long are both here, and will move forward at once. I will join you in person to-night if I possibly can. Let me know what is in your front and who is at Tuscaloosa.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION,

March 30, 1865-10 a. m.

[Brevet Major-General WILSON:]

GENERAL: My division will be across Cahawba by 2 p. m., I think. Can you not arrange so that I can leave every wheel except the guns and a caisson till our movements one the objective are finished? Celerity is everything. The battery is a great drag. I would like to take but two guns and the caisson with a complete relay of horses to each carriage. I could then move thirty miles a day without trouble. I will leave everything to-morrow, whatever may be the consequences, if anything

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*See Wilson to McCook, March 30, p. 135.

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