War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0127 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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stationed, much can be done before spring fairly. If, however, this is not done and at once, when the leaves come three regiments will not secure the country. Appeals, earnest and repeated, from loyal men, deserving all consideration, reach me continuously. That which is to be done must be done quickly and vigorously.

Most respectfully,

ELI H. MURRAY,

Colonel, Commanding District.

LEXINGTON, KY., March 29, 1865.

Captain BRIDGEWATER,

Stanford, Ky.:

There is a squad of guerrillas near Keene or Harrodsburg. Send out after them. Report result.

By order of Brigadier-General Hobson:

J. S. BUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF WEST MISSISSIPPI,

March 29, 1865.

Rear-Admiral H. K. THATCHER,

Commanding West Gulf Blockading Squadron:

ADMIRAL: We are progressing fairly, establishing new batteries, and making some changes in our line as we develop the enemy's line and strength. I will thrown back the right of our line to-day or to-night, so that the monitors can open on the fort without firing into our troops. I will be able to send you this afternoon a survey of the lines, and to indicate the direction that should be given to the fire of the monitors. The telegraph is now working to the landing, and by signal stations communication with your flag-ship can be kept.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General, Commanding.

WEST GULF SQUADRON, U. S. FRAG-SHIP STOCKDALE,

Off Howard's, March 29, 1865.

Major General E. R. S. CANBY,

Commanding Army and Division of West Mississippi, Two Miles east of Spanish Fort:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatches of the 28th and 29th instant. I am very glad to learn that you are progressing satisfactorily and that your heavy guns are coming up, as your small guns seem to us to have no effect. Last night's work developed a large number of infernal machines (submerged), and there are probably many more between us and the enemy's works, but I shall drag the ground with nets so soon as I receive machinery from New Orleans, which is now being prepared by my fleet engineer, to be attached to two tin-clads. I look for it every hour, and can then advance my monitors with perfect safety, even to the "piles." I am very glad that your telegraph works to the landing. I am shelling the western