War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0126 KY.,S. W. VA.,TENN.,N. & C. GA.,MISS.,ALA., & W. FLA.

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A steam-boat of the Selma and Montgomery line will be of great value to us. I have directed McCook to draw from your train and repay you as soon as the corps train is united.

Very respectfully,

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. 4TH DIV., CAVALRY CORPS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 36.

Elyton, Ala., March 29, 1865.

This division will move at 10.30 toward Montevallo in the following order: Second Brigade and battery, First Brigade. No other trains will accompany the troops except those authorized in the circular of yesterday, and they will follow the First Brigade. Division and Second Brigade headquarters wagons will follow the Second Brigade. General Winslow will detail one company to remain behind and take charge of the main train with instructions to move toward Montevallo as soon as the advance of the First Division reaches this point. He will also detail one company to proceed one mile and a half out the tuscaloosa road and there remain until the arrival of the First Division. The main train will remain here under guard of dismounted men after the company detailed by General Winslow leaves it. Captain Simpson will receive further instructions in regard to the movements of his train from corps headquarters.

By order of Brevet Major-General Upton:

JAMES W. LATTA,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF KENTUCKY,

Russellville, Ky., March 29, 1865.

Captain E. B. HARLAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of Kentucky:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following statement in reference to the condition of affairs within this district: There are now, at a moderate calculation, between 1,000 and 1,200 guerrillas within it in squads numbering from 10 to 100, all well mounted. My mounted force is not 400 (effective). Throughout the whole district our best Union men are seeking safety within the garrisoned towns. At no time during the war has [there] been so few mounted me in this section of the State as of late. It will require at least four times as many mounted men as there now are to keep the country cleared. These outlaws say openly to the people, "We know there are fe Federal cavalry in the country; therefore, we will sweep everything before us." Courts have in many cases ceased to be held, and if held their business is limited. Many of the most devotedly loyal citizens are leaving the State. Those remaining are in constant fear and suspense. I have thought best to submit these facts. The State is being overrun, depopulated of her best citizens. Insecurity and want of confidence is everywhere predominant. We must have horses for the Seventeenth Kentucky Cavalry. Another cavalry regiment can be and, I think, should be raised at once for service here. With the force now at hand organized and mounted, and with the forces as they are now