War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0072 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

New Market, East Tenn., March 24, 1865.

Colonel KIRBY,

Near Mossy Creek, Tenn.:

Send forward a regiment as soon as you can before moving to Morristown. A rebel cavalry force of 300, it is reported, will attack that place to-night. There are 40,000 rations there.

By order of Major-General Stanley:

J. S. FULLERTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

NEW MARKET, March 24, 1865 - 10.30 p. m.

Colonel KIRBY,

Mossy Creek, Tenn.:

Send the regiment to Morristown on the railroad train now leaving here for there. Please ship it as soon as possible.

By order of Major-General Stanley:

J. S. FULLERTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

KNOXVILLE, March 24, 1865.

Major-General KIMBALL:

All of your transportation will join you to-night. Try and get off for Russellville to-morrow. You will have to send your convalescents in the cars. Supplies will be sent to Morristown to follow up your wagons. Tell your quartermaster to have forage shipped to Russelville. Is there a guard for the Strawberry Plains bridge other than your troops?

D. S. STANLEY,

Major-General.

HDQRS. THIRD Brigadier, FIRST DIV., FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Strawberry Plains, Tenn., March 24, 1865.

Captain E. D. MASON,

Asst. Adjt. General, First Division, Fourth Army Corps:

CAPTAIN: Lieutenant-Colonel Lawton has returned and reports that he went two miles beyond Blain's Cross-Roads, but could not hear of any rebel force being in the vicinity. The citizens all agree in saying that no enemy has been in the vicinity to their knowledge.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. H. WATERS,

Colonel Eighty-fourth Illinois, Commanding.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Three Miles South of Russellville, [March] 24, 1865 - 6 p. m.

Major General G. H. THOMAS:

My command has passed beyond this place. Upton is on the head of Sipsey to-night. Long and McCook concentrate miles beyond here on the Tuscaloosa road. The latter was delayed by the very bad roads between Frankfort and Chickasaw, but everything is now running smoothly. Chalmers moved, with about 1,800 men, from Columbus on