War of the Rebellion: Serial 104 Page 0020 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Chickasaw, Ala., March 18, 1865.

Brigadier General E. HATCH,

Commanding Fifth Division, Cavalry Corps:

GENERAL: Forward to the First, Second, and Fourth Division any mounted stragglers that remain behind after the corps shall march, as long as communication is safe. All men who shall report to you coming from furlough, hospital, &c., after the corps has moved are to be forwarded to their respective divisions mounted and equipped whenever communication is open. These men will be collected by divisions, under officers of the same divisions, should any report. By command of Brevet Major-General Wilson:

E. B. BEAUMONT,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

CITY POINT, VA., March 18, 1865.

Brigadier-General DYER,

Chief of Ordnance, Washington:

There must be a large amount of ordnance and ordnance stores in the Departments of North Carolina and the South which cannot be of use in either of these departments, and much of which might answer to fill requisitions from other parts of the country. It probably will be advisable to send siege stores from Charleston to Mobile Bay without waiting requisitions.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, March 18, 1865.

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

City Point, Va.:

Telegram received. Senior ordnance officer, Department of the South, directed to consult with his commanding general and send in charge of an officer as complete a siege train as can be spared from that department to Mobile Bay. Quartermaster notified.

A. B. DYER,

Brigadier-General and Chief of Ordnance.

KNOXVILLE, March 18, 1865-8.10 p. m.

Major-General THOMAS:

Have received information, which I consider reliable, through parties just down from the vicinity of Abingdon, Va., to the effect that but one range, consisting of fourteen kettles, is in use at the salt-works. The railroad bridges destroyed last winter are not yet repaired. There is, however, one engine and five flat-cars and two box-cars which escaped us, and was cut off in turn, now running over that part of the road between Glade Spring and Jonesborough, and which we did not destroy. Between Glade Spring and New River the trains, I feel satisfied, are not running. The Confederate authorities are now engaged in conscripting the negroes, and send one in twenty to