War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 1043 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS EAST DIVISION, DISTRICT OF THE GULF,

Blakely, March 9, 1865-6.15 p. m.

Major-General MAURY, Mobile:

"D" reports that the enemy are still receiving re-enforcements; will make a move about the 15th. Enemy say it is not their intention to go to Montgomery. Enemy's lines advanced. Very few vessels in port.

ST. JNO. R. LIDDELL,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS EAST DIVISION, DISTRICT OF THE GULF,

Blakely, March 9, 1865-5.15 p. m.

General CLANTON, Commanding Pollard:

Part of the Second Maine started up the river on the 7th in direction of Milton. Be on the lookout for them. Large force at the navy-yard.

ST. JNO. R. LIDDELL,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS EAST DIVISION, DISTRICT OF THE GULF,

March 9, 1865-8.30 p. m.

Captain WINSTON, Commanding at Montrose:

Guard against being surprised on the eastern shore. Report promptly any advance of the enemy's vessels toward the shore.

ST. JNO. R. LIDDELL,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

(Same to Colonel Bushrod Jones, near Hollywood.)

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF FLORIDA,

Tallahassee, March 9, 1865.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN,

Governor of Georgia, Macon, Ga.:

SIR: Since I have been in command of this district the enemy has made tow attempts to invade or raid upon this State. One, from Cedar Keys, nearly a month since, was defeated [February 13] and the enemy driven back with considerable loss. The other and more formidable was directed against this place a few days since. The enemy came in some fourteen vessels, most of them represented as transports, off Saint Mark's Light-House, landed, and drove back our troops to Newport and burned a part of the village. We burned the bridge. The enemy then moved up by way of the Natural Bridge over the Saint Mark's, where we met them about 4 o'clock on the morning of the 6th instant and, after an obstinate fight, drove them back in confusion, and with considerable loss, to their vessels. They re-embarked, and nearly all of the vessels have disappeared. Their leaving just at this time is probably attributable to the very unfavorable weather, though prisoners report the command badly cut up and demoralized. Through we have been successful so far in holding this part of the country, I apprehend that other and more formidable efforts will be made by the enemy to get possession of Saint Mark's and this place, and perhaps of Chattahoochee. I need not point out to you the importance it is to Georgia that their efforts in this direction should be defeated. I respectfully ask, therefore, what aid I may look for in an emergency from South Georgia? I would suggest that if there are any organized bodies of State troops in that