War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 1030 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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MERIDIAN, March 5, 1865.

Brigadier General DAN ADAMS,

Montevallo, Ala.:

Endeavor to get positive information from Roddey relative to enemy's reported movements toward Chattanooga from vicinity of Huntsville.

By order of Lieutenant-General Taylor:

W. F. BULLOCK, JR.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Same to General Forrest.)

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT OF ALABAMA,

Montgomery, Ala., March 6, 1865.

General R. TAYLOR,

Meridian, Miss.:

DEAR SIR: I learned to-day indirectly through a man that I suspect to be friendly with the Yankees that General Thomas with 12,000 troops is at Dillon's Landing, on the Tennessee River, coming toward Selam and Montgomery. I do not know what force you have to protect that portion of North Alabama. I have called out all the militia I can command, and have made another appeal to the patriotism of those I have no power to order. I send you copy of my appeal. You know that I have at my command but little force, but whatever I can do will be done cheerfully and promptly.

Very respectful, yours,

T. H. WATTS,

Governor of Alabama.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 54.

Richmond, March 6, 1865.

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XXI. Brigadier General P. D. Roddey, Provisional Army, C. S., will report for orders with his cavalry command to Lieutenant General R. Taylor, commanding, &c.

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FORREST'S CAVALRY CORPS,

West Point, March 6, 1865.

Lieutenant General R. TAYLOR,

Meridian:

GENERAL: I have the honor to state that everything in my power is being done to have the troops in readiness for the field. It has rained almost every other day and the country is flooded with water. Tombigbee river is a mile wide. A part of Armstrong's brigade is on one side and a part on the other of that stream, with no chance or way of getting it together until the water falls. Tibbee River is over the whole country and several bridges and water-gaps washed out of the railroad between this place and Verona. To move with troops, wagons, or artillery until the streams run down is utterly impossible. I think,