War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0870 KY.,S.W.VA.,TENN., N. & C.GA.,MISS.,ALA., & W.FLA.

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NASHVILLE, March 9, 1865.

Brigadier General W. D. WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The following copy of a telegram just received is furnished for the information of the major-general commanding:

JOHNSONVILLE, TENN., March 8, 1865.

Bvt. Brigadier General J. L. DONALDSON,

Assistant Quartermaster:

The dispatch you refer to as having left Nashville March 3, was received by me about 1 o'clock yesterday, March 7. All dispatches have been forwarded. The delays heretofore were caused by the refusal of boat to land when signaled.

R. P. JOHNSON,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

The dispatch above referred to was the one about delays at Johnsonville, concerning which the general is informed. Captain Johnson was yesterday empowered to use all necessary authority to compel boats to land for telegrams.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. L. DONALDSON,

Brevet Brigadier-General and Chief Quartermaster.

CHIEF QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, Tenn., March 9, 1865.

Major General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Washington:

DEAR GENERAL: I want you to read the inclosed to General Allen, and inclose it in a private letter. It is a brief resume of things here, and is not without times of interest to you. We are going on as usual. The influx of troops is working the department up again, and if we penetrate to the Virginia lien we shall have a longer railroad than ever. I hope, however, that the rebels will be disastrously used in Virginia and North Carolina, so that the thing may be finished up next summer.

Very truly,

J. L. DONALDSON,

Quartermaster.

[Inclosure.]

CONFIDENTIAL.] CHIEF QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, Tenn., March 8, 1865.

Brigadier General ROBERT ALLEN,

Chief Quartermaster, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I had a conversation with General Thomas last night, and he informed me that twenty-two additional regiments have been ordered to his department. This will raise the number of troops to some 70,000 men, with a proportionate number of animals, and, as the troops are already arriving. I have considered the subject of supplies for the present and the future.

First. Quartermaster's stores: Captain W. A. Wainwright, assistant quartermaster, in charge of quartermaster's stores here, estimated on the basis of 150,000 men. On the reduction of the department he cut his estimates down one-half, and in view of future contingencies I think the reduction about right. You seemed to think his estimates extravagant,