War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0747 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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H. sen off a feeble dispatches, of which a copy in inclosed,* which is no order at all. I am wiling that General Halleck should punish me all he is able to for my instrumentality in getting through the lieutenant-general bill, but I protest against his visiting his ill will toward me on a faithful officer who was in no way responsible for my action in that matters. Mrs. W. arrived here safely on Saturday night.

Truly, yours,

E. B. WASHBURNE,

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 20, 1865-p. m.

Major General G. H. THOMAS,

Eastport:

General Grant things that General Washburn should take General Dana's place at Memphis.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Johnsonville, February 20, 1865. (Received 11. 30 p. m.)

General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

If Major-General Washburn is ordered to report to me I will assign him to duty at Memphis. I understand he is now at Vicksburg.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, Commanding.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, D. C., February 20, 1865.

Honorable EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: In accordance with the remarks in indorsement by the Quartermaster-General, dated February 1, 1865 (upon a report+ by the Lieutenant Colonel William Sinclair, assistant inspector-general, upon the destruction of property at Johnsville, referred to this by the War Department), to forward General Allen's report as soon as received, I have the honor herewith to inclose a copy of a report from Brigadier General Robert Allen, senior quartermaster, Valley of the Mississippi, relative to losses by destruction of Government property at Johnsville, Tenn., November 4, 1864. Lieutenant Colonel William Sinclair, in his report to the Inspector-General U. S. Army of January 7, 1865 state that telegraphic information was furnished Captain Henry Howland, assistant quartermaster at Johnsonville, of the capture and burning of steamers on the river in ample time for landing the property on the steam-boats and barges at Johnsonville, which, however, was not done; that the firing of the boats was premature, considering the force at Johnsonville and the very limited facilities of the rebels for crossing the river; that the boats could have been temporarily disabled instead of being destroyed, and that had the firing been deferred until a change of

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* See next, post.

+ See Vol. XXXIX, Part I, p. 860.

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