War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0745 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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men who will bring in some of them before the end of this week. Please let me know to-night if the general will allow me to look after them.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. H. G. MINTY,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI.

Gravelly Springs, Ala., February 19, 1865.

Colonel R. H. MINTY,

Commanding Second Brigade:

COLONEL: You have permission to send as many men as you think proper after the guerrillas near Waynesborough, Tenn. Should they deem it necessary to remain absent longer than four of five days, they will report their whereabouts to these headquarters by courier.

By command of Brigadier General Eli Long:

T. W. SCOTT,

Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

LOUISVILLE, February 19, 1865.

(Received 20 th.)

Major-General WILSON:

I have report to General Thomas, and am now on my way by steamer from this point to join my command.

EDWD. HATCH,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIV., MILITARY DISTRICT OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, February 19, 1865.

Captain J. BATES DICKSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Military Division of Kentucky:

In the absence of the general I have the honor to report that I have ordered two companies Fifty-fourth Kentucky, and one of Fifty-third Kentucky, to Mount Sterling, to partially supply the place of Eleventh Michigan Cavalry. I deem this better then to evacuate the town and fort, because the effect of such a thing would cause a great deal of unnecessary alarm in the country, and the country would open from Pound Gap to Lexington. At the same time Colonel Mims, Thirty-ninth Kentucky, will send heavy scouts from Louisa to West Liberty, and Colonel Buckley has been ordered to complete his organization as soon as possible, and scout the country continually with what force he has. I will endeavor to send 150 men from Camp Nelson to Richmond, if it does not weaken the strength of the camp too much. I would respectfully submit to you the following for consideration, without attempting to suggest: Would it not be well to relieve Fifth-third Kentucky, on Kentucky Central Railroad, with colored troops, even if in process of organization, and immediately mount and equip Fifty-third and Fifty-fifth Kentucky for protection of Lexington and Frankfort, and establish a system of patrolling through the country, leaving