War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0667 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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FRANKFORT, KY., February 7, 1865. (Received 12.55 p. m.)

E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your attention is called to the following order just issued by Burbridge. Please answer:

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF KENTUCKY, Numbers 5.

Lexington, Ky., February 6, 1865.

His Excellency the President of the United States, as Commander-in-Chief of the Army of Navy, having declared martial law in the Military District of Kentucky, the organizing, equipping, and maintaining of troops under State authority is unlawful, and all troops so organized, equipped,a nd maintained must at once be disbanded. Commanding officers of such troops of every grade will at once see that the arms in their hands are returned to the State arsenal, or delivered to the nearest U. S. quartermaster, to be thus returned, and the troops disbanded.

By order of Bvt. Major General S. G. Burbridge:

J. BATES DICKSON,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

THOS. E BRAMLETTE,

Governor.

COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Frankfort, [February] 7, 1865.

Honorable E. M. STANTION,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

DEAR SIR: I telegraphed you to-day the Order, Numbers 5, just issued by General Burbridge and now inclose you his order as published in this morning's Journal.* This unwarranted assumption of power by an imbecile commander is doubtless instigated by those who have so long sought to provoke an issue with the State, and which I have prevented. I trust you will take such action as will aid me in avoiding all semblance of hostility. The committee who visited Washington inform me that your views and my own coincide upon this subject.

Respectfully,

THOS. E. BRAMLETTE,

Governor of Kentucky.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, February 7, 1865.

Major-General BURBRIDGE,

Lexington, Ky.:

The subject to which your General Orders, Numbers 5, just issued, relates is now, and, as you are well aware, for some time has been under the immediate consideration of the President. He considers your action in issuing that order as premature, and that you should have waited until his determination had been communicated to you, and he directs that you immediately revoke the Order, Numbers 5, and abstain from making any other upon the subject until further instructed by him or by his order.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

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*Same as next, ante.

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