War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0661 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Gravelly Springs, Ala., February 6, 1865.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following recommendations: Brigadier General Edward Hatch, commanding Fifth Division, Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi, to be brevet major-general for gallant and meritorious conduct in turning the enemy's left flank during the battles of Nashville December 15 or 16, and four skill in commanding his division during the pursuit of the rebels under Hood. Colonel Datus E. Coon, Second Iowa Cavalry, commanding the Second Brigade, Fifth Division, to be brevet brigadier-general for gallant conduct in assaulting the enemy's works in front of Nashville, December 15, 1864. Bvt. Brigadier General J. H. Hammond, commanding First Brigade, Seventh Division,m for distinguished bravery and skill in the command of his brigade during the pursuit of the rebel army under General Hood from Tennessee, to be assigned to duty according to his brevet rank from November 25, 1864. Lieutenant Colonel A. J. Alexander, assistant adjutant-general, Seventeenth Army Corps, acting chief of staff Cavalry Corps, Military Division of the Mississippi, for gallant and distinguished service during the battles of Nashville and the pursuit of Hood from Tennessee, to be specially mustered under his commission as colonel of the Tenth Missouri Cavalry, it not having at present the requisite number of enlisted men to entitle it to a colonel.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Gravelly Springs, Ala., February 6, 1865.

Brigadier-General WHIPPLE:

SIR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the major-general commanding, that during the pursuit of Hood's army and the march from Athens to this place it was with the greatest difficulty forage could be obtained in sufficient quantities to keep the horses of my command in marching condition. From this scarcity the percentage of loss was very great, both from actual starvation and disease partly induced thereby. If the command could have taken time to search for grain during the march, it could have been found, but in that event but little damage would have been inflicted on the enemy. In districts not traveled over by contending armies, commands of cavalry marching through them for the first time experience but little difficulty in obtaining forage; but 10,000 or 15,000 horses can consume the surplus of a very rich district in an incredibly short time. No system depending upon the enemy entirely can be devised for keeping and feeling our cavalry force, and therefore depots of grain and hay must be provided when cavalry is to be put upon a basis of thorough efficiency. Foraging is necessary, proper, and effective during the progress of a campaign, but is always expensive, through the fact that it gives license to the men and overwork to the horses. Whenever cavalry is to rest and recuperate the Quartermaster's Department should furnish the necessary supplies.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. WILSON,

Brevet Major-General.