War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0624 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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at New Orleans were issued several days since, but, as I stated in my telegram of the 29th, there will be some delay in the whole force reaching their destination, on account of the partial stoppage of navigation in the Ohio and Mississippi by ice formed during the recent severe weather.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., February 1, 1865 - 12.40 p. m.

Brigadier General ROBERT ALLEN,

Louisville:

Transportation will be required for all animals and wagons sent by General Thomas to General Canby, but the first thing to be done is to get off the infantry, which, with very little transportation, can assist in taking Mobile or establishing some other base while waiting for land transportation for a campaign into the interior. General Canby has been notified of this arrangement. Of course preparations must be made to send forage for the animals, as I presume Canby has no great surplus.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Eastport, Miss., February 1, 1865 - 10 p. m.

Brigadier General J. L. DONALDSON,

Chief Quartermaster, Department of the Cumberland, Nashville:

Your telegram of 10.10 a. m. January 31 is received. The major-general commanding directs me to say that it is better for the division of the Fourth Army Corps that is to come here to follow out the original order, as, if the roads are as bad from Huntsville as they are out here, it would take the command a month to reach this place.

ROBT. H. RAMSEY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, SEVENTH DIV.,

CAV. CORPS, MIL. DIV. OF THE MISS., No. 24. Gravelly Springs, Ala., February 1, 1865.

Pursuant to orders from corps headquarters, I take temporary leave of the brigade, and turn over the command to Colonel George W. Jackson, Ninth Indiana Cavalry, senior officer present. I cannot dissolve my official connection, even for a time, with a body of men whose interests have become my own, and whom I had come to regard as my family, without regret. During our existence as a brigade we have suffered hardship, have lived roughly, marched hard and fought hard, as much so as any in the Cavalry Corps, and have met with almost constant victory. I leave you with the assurance that you have no superior in discipline and in the performance of duty, and that you have all the elements that make good soldiers.

With earnest wishes for a successful career to you all, I bid you farewell.

J. H. HAMMOND,

Brigadier-General.