War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0600 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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next day (the 25th). After the greater part of the regiment had got aboard, the boiler deck began to give way, and we had to take off two companies and put them aboard the Swaim, a steamer which had been selected to carry 150 men of the One hundred and fourteenth Ohio, the ambulances, &c. The Warrior, however, got off by noon, at which time it was reported the Saint Charles would start in an hour. The Swaim was out of repair and also required coal, and it was reported to me she would not start till 3 o'clock, which would be some two hours, after everything belonging to the troops was aboard. The Warrior, being heavily loaded with lumber, made slow time. She reached East Pascogoula a little before daylight yesterday, but owing to the shallow stage of water, was not able to get up to the wharf. I immediately in person reported to Major General Gordon Granger, according to your instructions. He directed that I should proceed to Barrancas, Fla., but was of the opinion the Warrior was not suitable for the passage, but would determine on seeing her captain. To hasten matters I at once returned to the Warrior and sent the captain (Rowe) up to General Granger's, it being half a mile from where she was lying, having promised to call back and get instructions from General Granger in an hour. This I did, and after getting written instructions returned on board. It was now 8 a. m., and I was sorry to find that the Warrior was unable to move, the tide having gone out and left her aground. We did not, therefore, get off from Pascagoula till 11 a. m. yesterday. I have already selected a camp-ground for the brigade.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. C. ANDREWS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

PADUCAH, KY., January 27, 1865.

Governor O. P. MORTON,

Indianapolis, Ind.:

The steamer Eclipse blew up at Johnsonville at 6 a. m. this day, Ninth Indiana Battery, Captain Brown, on board. Sixty-eight men injured, more or less; ten died. They have arrived at this post. I am doing all I can for them. If you can render any assistance, please do so for the wounded.

S. MEREDITH,

Brigadier-General.

LOUISVILLE, KY., January 28, 1865.

(Received 4.50 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

Will transportation for wagons and teams be required?

ROBT. ALLEN,

Brigadier-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., January 28, 1865-10.10 p. m.

General R. ALLEN,

Louisville:

We want to get the troops off first. The matter of wagons and trains will be attended to hereafter. Until Mobile or some other point is