War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0595 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

between Pollard and Blakely, except as to numbers (of which she has no positive knowledge), with the further information that the rebels were rapidly evacuating Mobile and have been removing ammunition and other stores for some time. If this is correct the object of the troops on the railroad near Pollard is obvious.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THO. J. McKEAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanidng District.

(Copy to Captain William L. Avery, acting assistant adjutant-general, East Pascogoula.)

EASPORT, MISS., January 27, 1865-2 p. m.

(Received 1 p. m. 28th.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

Your telegram of 6 p. m. 25th is just received. Orders have been given for the Fourth Regiment Missouri Cavalry to go to Memphis for reorganization. Please let me know as soon as possible General Grant's decision whether I shall make a campaign or send re-enforcements to Canby. I can start from here early in the spring, but I do not believe that any effectual progress could be made with the roads in their present condition. If left to my choice I should select the route described in my telegram of the 24th. Please let me know the decision of the Secretary of War whether Columbus, Ky., is in my department or in that of Canby, and whether my command still constitutes a part of the Military Division of the Mississippi or not.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

EASPORT, MISS., January 27, 1865.

(Received 10.20 p. m. 28th.)

Major-General HALLECK:

Orders have been issued directing the Forty-eight Missouri Infantry, six-months's regiment, to report to commanding officer at Chicago for duty guarding prisoners of war.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.

LOUISVILLE, KY., January 27, 1865.

(Received 2.30 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Chief of Staff:

Dispatch received last night. The weather is intensely cold. The river is full of ice and frozen, besides the Ohio is gorged with ice thirty miles below the falls, cutting off all communication with the mouth of Tennessee from this point. Nearly all the Ohio are above the falls, not having returned from transporting Schofield's command, and they can not now get down. We can command only those running from Cairo and such as are laid up there. The number I fear will not be sufficient to effect the whole movement at once. The former are wanted on the Tennessee and Ohio and on the Mississippi below Cairo.