War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0478 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FOURTH DIV., CAV. CORPS,

MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Numbers 21.

Edgefield, Tenn., June 10, 1865.

Before severing his connection with the command, the brevet major-general commanding desires to express his high appreciation of the bravery, endurance, and soldierly qualities displayed by the officers and men of his division in the late cavalry campaign. Leaving Chickasaw on the 22nd of March as a new organization and without status in the Cavalry Corps, you in one month traversed 600 miles; crossed six rivers; met and defeated the enemy at Montevallo, capturing 100 prisoners; routed Forrest, Buford, and Roddey in their chosen position at Ebenzer Church, capturing 2 guns and 300 prisoners; carried the works in your front at Selma, capturing 13 guns, 1,100 prisoners, and 5 battle-flags, and finally crowned your successes by a night assault upon the enemy's entrenchments at Columbus, where you captured 1,500 prisoners, 24 guns, 8 battle-flags, and vast munitions of war. April 21 you arrived at Macon, having captured on your march 3,000 prisoners, 39 pieces of artillery, and 13 battle-flags. Whether mounted with the saber of dismounted with the carbine, the brave men of the Third, Fourth, and Fifth Iowa, First and Seventh Ohio, and Tenth Missouri Cavalry triumphed over the enemy in every conflict. With regiments led by brave colonels and brigades commanded with consummate skill and daring the division in thirty days won a reputation unsurpassed in the service. Though many of you have not received the rewards your gallantry has entitled you, to you have received the commendation of your superior officers and have won the admiration and gratitude of your countrymen. You will return to your homes with the proud consciousness of having defended the flag of your country in the hour of the greatest national peril, while through your instrumentality liberty and civilization will have advanced the greatest stride recorded in history. The best wishes of your commanding general will ever attend you.

E. UPTON,

By JAMES W. LATTA,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 33. Reports of Bvt. Brigadier General Edward F. Winslow, Fourth Iowa Cavalry; commanding First Brigade, of operations March 21-April 20.

HDQRS. FIRST Brigadier, FOURTH DIV., CAVALRY CORPS,

MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Macon, Ga., April 21, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations of my command since leaving Chickasaw Landing, Tennessee River, March 21 last:

The distance marched direct has been 488 miles while the scouting, expeditionary, flanking and foraging marches swell the number of miles to an average of 600 to each regiment. Though much of this has been over a mountainous and partially sterile region we have found sufficient corn, and, if it were not for the long, hard marches, often extending into the night, our animals would now be in exceedingly good condition. Those worn out have been abandoned or turned over to the negroes and their places supplied with captured horses and mules. The care of