War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0368 KY.,S.W.VA.,TENN., N. & C.GA.,MISS.,ALA., & W.FLA.

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Georgia, to ship their grain and provisions to me, and this before any terms of capitulation had been made known to him or myself. I had about 17,000 men besides prisoners, and 22,000 animals to feed, and to have been compelled to forage for them would have resulted in the devastation of the entire country in the vicinity of the city. On the 30th of April General Croxton, with his brigade, last heard of through General Forrest, arrived at Forsyth, and the next day marched to this place. After having skirmished with Jackson's force, estimated correctly at 2,600 men, near Trion on the morning of April 2 [1] he determined to effect by strategy what he could not expect to do by fighting, having with him only 1,100 men. He therefore marched rapidly toward Johnson's Ferry, on the Black Warrior River, forty miles above Tuscaloosa, threw Jackson completely off his guard by a simulated flight, crossed his brigade to the west side of the river, and turned toward Northport, where he arrived at 9 p.m. April 4 [3]. About midnight, fearing that his presence must become known, he surprised the force stationed on the bridge and crossed into Tuscaloosa. He captured 3 guns, 150 prisoners, and after daylight scattered the militia and State cadets, destroyed the military school, the stores, and public works. He remained at that place until the 5th trying to communicate with General McCook or to hear from me, but without success. Knowing that Jackson and Chalmers were both on the west side of the Cahawba, he thought it too hazardous to attempt a march by the way of Centerville, and therefore decided to move toward Eutaw, in the hope of crossing the Warrior lowed down and breaking the railroad between Selma and Demopolis. Accordingly, he abandoned Tuscaloosa, burned the bridge across the Black Warrior, and strict off to the southeast. When within seven miles of Eutaw he heard of the arrival at that place of Wirt Adams' division of cavalry, numbering 2,600 men. Fearing to risk an engagement with a superior force, backed by the militia, he countermarched and moved again in the direction of Tuscaloosa; leaving it to the right, passed on through Jasper, recrossed the West Fork of the Warrior River at Hanby's Mills, marched nearly due east by the way of Mount Pinson and Trussville, crossed the Coosa at Truss' and Collins' Ferries, and marched to Talladega. Near this place he met and scattered a force of rebels under General Hill, captured 150 prisoners and 1 gun, and moved on toward Blue Mountain, the terminus of the Alabama and Tennessee Railroad. After destroying all the iron-works and factories left by us in Northern Alabama and Georgia, he continued his march by Carrollton, Newman, and Forsyth to this place. He had no knowledge of any movements except what he got from rumor, but fully expected to form a junction with me at this place or at Augusta. The admirable judgment and sagacity displayed by General Croxton throughout his march of over 650 miles in thirty days, as well as the good conduct and endurance of his command, are worthy of the highest commendation. For the details of his operations I respectfully refer to his report, herewith.* On the 30th of April I received notice of the final capitulation of the rebel forces east of the Chattahoochee, and the next day, by the hands of Colonel Woodall, the order of the Secretary of War annulling the first armistice, directing the resumption of hostilities and the capture of the rebel chiefs. I had been previously advised of Davis' movements, and had given the necessary instructions to secure a clue to the route he intended following, with the hope of finally effecting his capture. I directed General Upton to proceed in person to Augusta, and ordered General Winslow with the Fourth

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*See p.418.

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