War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0153 THE MOBILE CAMPAIGN.

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Nearly all the pieces are spiked and have a projectile jammed in the bore. The larger portion of the carriages upon which the guns were mounted, together with the gunners' implements, were partially or wholly destroyed.

Respectfully submitted.

J. J. WILLIAMSON,

Captain and Chief of Ordnance, Thirteenth Army Corps.

Major F. W. EMERY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, HDQRS. THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Mobile, Ala., May 5, 1865.

MAJOR: In obedience to orders received I have the honor to report the following as the amount of both small-arm and artillery ammunition expended during the siege of Spanish Fort, Ala., viz, 498,715 rounds rifled musket elongated ball cartridges, caliber .577.

3-inch rifles: Fourth Massachusetts Battery, 653 rounds; Seventh Massachusetts Battery, 570 rounds; Twenty-first New York Battery, 566 rounds. 3.50-inch rifles: Battery F, First Missouri Light Artillery 1,102 rounds. Light 12-pounders: Seventh Massachusetts Battery, 349 rounds; Twenty-first New York Battery, 681 rounds; Twenty-sixth New York Battery, 811 rounds; Whitworth gun, 136 rounds. 30-pounder Parrotts: Battery M, First Indiana Heavy Artillery, 385 rounds. 20-pounder Parrotts: Eighteenth New York Battery, 2,000 rounds. 8-inch mortars: Battery B, First Indiana Artillery, 639 rounds. 8-inch howitzers: Battery C, First Indiana Heavy Artillery, 286 rounds. 4.10-inch mortars: Battery K, Sixth Michigan Heavy Artillery, 495 rounds.

Respectfully submitted.

J. J. WILLIAMSON,

Captain and Chief of Ordnance, Thirteenth Army Corps.

Major F. W. EMERY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Thirteenth Army Corps.

Numbers 10. Report of Surg. Charles B. White, U. S. Army, Medical Director.

HEADQUARTERS THIRTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

OFFICE OF MEDICAL DIRECTOR,

Mobile, Ala., May 24, 1865.

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit the following report, in obedience to instructions from your office, bearing date April 21, 1865:

The campaign of the Thirteenth Army Corps from Fort Morgan to its position in the rear of Spanish Fort was very laborious. Much of the ground over which the corps passed was of quicksand covered by sod. This sod once broken through, horses and wagons sank to such a depth that the assistance of troops was necessary to extricate them. The men worked in rain and mud for several days till firm ground was reached and good weather prevailed, dragging wagons and artillery through by hand and in constructing many miles of corduroy. This immense labor was performed with energy, alacrity,a and in high spirits. Rest for thirty-six hours was afforded them at Fish River, and though