War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0099 THE MOBILE CAMPAIGN.

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Mobile, and occupied the city at noon of that day. The losses sustained during the campaign were:

Officers.

Killed. Wounded. Captured or

missing.

Thirteenth Corps ... 26 1

(a)

Sixteenth Corps 3 26 ...

Steele's command 6 15 ...

Cavalry Brigade 1 5 ...

First Indiana ... 1 ...

Heavy Artillery

Total 10 73 1

Continuation: Enlisted men.

Killed. Wounded. Captured or

missing.

Thirteenth Corps 68 474 26

(a)

Sixteenth Corps 65 436 7

Steele's command 25 270 ...

Cavalry Brigade 8 24 2

First Indiana 1 18 ...

Heavy Artillery

Total 167 1,222 35

Grand total ........................................ *1,508

a Included in this are 46 killed and 246 wounded while under Steele's command at Blakely.

The loss of the enemy in killed and wounded was not fully ascertained. Partial records captured at Blakely account for 73 killed and 320 wounded at that place and Spanish Fort, but the reports do not include the operations of Steele's forces on the march or the preliminary operations at Spanish Fort and Blakely, and no report is made of the losses at Spanish Fort during the bombardment of the 4th, at the capture on the 8th, or during the assault of Blakely on the 9th. It probably exceeded one-half of our own loss. The number of prisoners originally reported was nearly 6,000, but the number accounted for by the provost-marshal-general was 4 generals, 304 commissioned officers of lower grades, and 4,616 enlisted men; total, 4,924. The other results were the capture of - flags, 231 pieces of artillery, and a large quantity of army material and naval stores, the details of which are given in the reports of the heads of the staff department serving with the army.

The subsequent operations will be briefly stated: Bertram's brigade, of the Thirteenth Corps, was charged with the duty of holding the works and collecting the captured property on the east side of Mobile Bay. The Sixteenth Corps was put in march for Montgomery on the 14th. Grierson, with 4,000 effective cavalry, was sent on the 17th on Smith's right flank, to cover as much ground as possible and break up all communications between Johnston's and Taylor's armies. Benton was sent with his division to close up the Tombigbee River, and in conjunction with the navy to prevent the egress of the rebel gun-boats. Steele with his original infantry force and some artillery was sent by water to Montgomery, convoyed by the navy, and the remainder of the cavalry force was organized into a bridge under West for operations west of the Tombigbee. Steele and Smith had Montgomery, Grierson with the cavalry was at Eufaula, Union Springs, and Benton was in position, when further operations were stayed by the armistice, but as soon as this was terminated orders were given to resume them throughout the division. The notice to Taylor was accompanied by an offer of terms which were accepted and the articles signed at Citronelle on the 5th [4th] of May, Admiral Thatcher acting for the navy and arranging for the surrender of the rebel naval forces. The Sixteenth Corps and

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* But see revised statement, p. 115.

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