War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0079 EXPEDITION INTO NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI.

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11 p. m. When within one mile of the pickets the front of my command was fired on by guerrillas, two of whom we captured and sent with charges to Irving Block Prison. Five escaped on horseback.

I used every endeavor to protect private property, and for this purpose issued stringent orders against stealing. I directed each regimental commander to appoint a rear guard, with strict instructions to permit no enlisted man to pass or repass unless under detail with a commissioned officer. This, with the provost guard placed at every house and with the general diligence of officers, reduced straggling to small numbers; but permit me to say that a most stringent rule must be adopted to enforce compliance therewith, both with officers and men, before the command will be thoroughly efficient. Every straggler destroys his horse and otherwise wastes the public property intrusted to him. I found the citizens generally depressed. The poor simply asked for peace, and seemed to comprehend that it was their more wealthy neighbors who caused the war. The wealthy are as usual stealthy and corrupt, but their only question was, What is the best the Government will do? There is an evident feeling of doubt amongst them. The best information I could get was that Forrest was himself at West Point. His forces were variously stated at from 10,000 to 30,000. Jackson was said to be at Verona with from 1,000 to 5,000, said to be mounted, to be dismounted, and to be partially mounted, the last of which is probably true. His orders were to move south to join Forrest. The waters were very high; almost all bridges washed away. Roads muddy and much washed. The brigade and regimental commanders and Captains Reed and Moore and Lieutenant Koffman, of my staff, deserve mention for their promptness in the performance of their various duties.

List of losses in men and material in the several regiments, as reported by their brigade commanders preparatory to this report, showing losses in respective regiments, except in Third Brigade. Losses and gains of stock are not designated:

Lost men.

Killed. Died. Wounded.

First Brigade:

7th Indiana ... ... ...

Cavalry

5th Illinois ... ... ...

Cavalry

2nd Arkansas ... ... ...

Cavalry

Total ... ... ...

Second Brigade:

12th Illinois 2 ... ...

Cavalry

1st Iowa Cavalry ... ... 1

11th New York ... ... ...

Cavalry

Total 2 ... 1

Third Brigade ... 1 ...

Continuation: Lost.

Horses. Mules. Horse

equipments.

First Brigade:

7th Indiana 7 1 ...

Cavalry

5th Illinois 20 ... ...

Cavalry

2nd Arkansas 12 ... ...

Cavalry

Total 39 1 ...

Second Brigade:

12th Illinois 14 6 2

Cavalry

1st Iowa Cavalry 15 1 1

11th New York 28 4 ...

Cavalry

Total 57 11 3

Third Brigade 5 3 1

Continuation: Lost. Captured.

Carbines. Horses. Mules.

First Brigade:

7th Indiana ... 10 7

Cavalry

5th Illinois ... 5 8

Cavalry

2nd Arkansas ... 8 5

Cavalry

Total ... 23 20

Second Brigade:

12th Illinois ... 9 10

Cavalry

1st Iowa Cavalry 1 2 8

11th New York ... 7 7

Cavalry

Total 1 18 25

Third Brigade 1 6 3

RECAPITULATION.

Lost men.

Killed. Died. Wounded.

First Brigade ... ... ...

Second Brigade 2 ... 1

Third Brigade ... 1 ...

Grand total 2 1 1

Continuation: Lost.

Horses. Mules. Horse

equipments.

First Brigade 39 1 ...

Second Brigade 57 11 3

Third Brigade 5 3 1

Grand total 101 15 4

Continuation: Lost. Captured.

Carbines. Horses. Mules.

First Brigade ... 23 20

Second Brigade 1 18 25

Third Brigade 1 6 3

Grand total 2 47 48