War of the Rebellion: Serial 103 Page 0056 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.

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and that that was the only means they had of drawing it. Below is a copy of a pass given by A. D. McNary to the prisoners after releasing them:

HEADQUARTERS SCOUTS,

February 23, 1865.

SOLDIERS AND GUARDS:

Pass free from molestation John Vorees, wagon-master, and twelve laborers. These are my prisoners, and any interference with them will be punished as it deserves.

A. D. MCNARY,

Captain, Commanding Scouts.

Mr. H. R. CAROTHERS:

You will try and give the twelve men accommodations to-night, and give them directions to the nearest point on the railroad.

J. G. MCNAIRY.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. H. CLEMENS,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

Captain F. J. CRILLY,

Assistant Quartermaster,

Chief Quartermaster U. S. Military Railroads.

FEBRUARY 20-24, 1865. - Expedition to Greeneville and Warrensburg, Tenn., with skirmishes (21st and 22nd) near Greeneville.

Report of Major Thomas H. Reeves, Fourth Tennessee Infantry.

HDQRS. FOURTH TENNESSEE INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS,

Moser's Mill. Tenn., February 25, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to state that, in accordance with instructions, the Fourth Regiment Tennessee Infantry Volunteers, on the 20th instant, was en route for Greeneville, Tenn.; arrived at that place at 10 a. m. on the 21st instant, a distance of thirty miles; nothing occurred worthy of note on the march. About 12 m. our picket was attacked on the Jonesborough road by a small squad of rebels, but they were soon repulsed; all was quiet then until about the same time on the 22nd instant, when there was a repetition of the picket fighting which did not amount to anything serious. The election was held in the town of Greeneville, and I suppose all the loyal inhabitants had the privilege of voting. I left Greeneville on the 23rd instant at 9 a. m. and, after a very disagreeable day's march through incessant rain, arrived at Warrensburg and learned that it was the intention of Colonel Tool, C. S. Army, who was commanding a force of 100 mounted men, to camp there that night; there were four of his men captured on our picket-line that night. I subsequently learned that he had passed around the town to our left. I left Warrensburg ont he 24th instant, and arrived at our camp at this place the same evening. From best information there are but few rebels in East Tennessee; however, they were making preparations to attack me on the 24th, had I remained, with a force of about 200, commanded by Colonel Gillespie, C. S. Army. My opinion is that a small force of cavalry supported by a small force of infantry could hold the country as high up as Greeneville or Jonesborough.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. H. REEVES,

Major Fourth Tennessee Infantry Volunteers, Commanding Regiment.

Captain W. W. DEANE,

Asst. Adjt. General, Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps.