War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1305 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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of the Confederate States speaks in some tangible and authoritative manner. We formed the Confederation and the nations of this Territory formed alliance, offensive and defensive, with the Confederate States Government, and we have no right to be looking to separate managements. It is the best policy to act honorably and stand to the engagements with each other.

C.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF INDIAN TERRITORY,

May 14, 1865.

Colonel D. N. McIntosh AND OTHERS:

COLONEL: Information having been received that Blunt is making preparations for a movement from Fort Gibson on Texas through the Indian Territory, it is necessary that the troops should be concentrated immediately as the camp near Boggy Dept. You will therefore take necessary measures to collect Your men and bring them into camp at once.

Respectfully, Your obedient servant,

D. H. COOPER,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CHURCHILL'S DIVISION,

Numbers 42.

Marshall, May 14, 1865.

I. In accordance with instructions, all details, &c., on the fortifications at this place will be discontinued until further orders.

By command of Major-General Churchill:

A. H. SEVIER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT,

Numbers 45.

Shreveport, La., May 15, 1865.

Major Ed. A. Burk is announced as chief inspector of field transportation for the department during the temporary absence of Major C. D. Hill. He will report to Lieutenant Colonel John E. Garey, chief quartermaster, for instructions.

By command of General E. Kirby Smith:

S. S. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT WASHITA, C. N., May 15, 1865.

Colonel S. S. ANDERSON,

Asst. Adjt. General, Trans-Mississippi Department, Shreveport, La.:

COLONEL: Reports of scouts from neighborhood of Fort Smith, to the effect that Blunt was collecting a cavalry force for a raid into Texas from Fort Gibson, have been sent You. I have parties up about Gibson, and will hear soon if there is any movement on foot. I do not at present credit the story, but have called the Indians into camp and will take all necessary precautions. We want arms, breadstuffs, and money to buy beef, which can be drawn from the front. The purchasing agents in Texas appropriate the lion's share of money, the effect of which is to force our people to drive the cattle to Texas for sale and my commissary of district to obtain the same beef back again, after becoming poor, on requisition. The troops consequently refuse