War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1265 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CHURCHILL'S DIVISION, No. 23. Shreveport, April 6, 1865.

I. This division will move for Marshall, Tex., on Saturday morning, 8th instant, at sunrise, in the following order: First, Hawthorn's brigade; second, Roane's brigade; third, Tappan's brigade; fourth, McNair's brigade. The trains will move in the rear of the entire division in the order of their respective commands.

II. Brigade inspectors will report to Captain Sevier, assistant inspector-general, at these headquarters on Saturday morning at sunrise.

By command of Major-General Churchill:

B. S. JOHNSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY FORCES FRONT LINES,

Lodi, April 7, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel J. N. GALLEHER,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

(Through Brigadier-General Bagby, etc.)

COLONEL: Lieutenant E. A. Carmouche some time since received authority from department headquarters to raise a company of cavalry east of the Atchafalaya. He has forwarded me a muster-roll of ninety-two enlisted men, and I respectfully recommend that some officer be designated and instructed to muster the company into service.

Yours, respectfully,

J. L. BRENT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY FORCES FRONT LINES,

Lodi, April 7, 1865.

Captain N. WHITE,

Commanding, &c.:

CAPTAIN: You will direct Your attention particularly to the breaking up of the cotton trade with the enemy, picketing in special reference thereto. For this purpose I have obtained infantry to strengthen You. The high water opens the connection of the waters of the Red with the swamps back and around You, and reports are that efforts are being made to use this opportunity for getting cotton into Red River through Pearl Lake, Bayou de Lac, Bout de Bayou, and other sloughs. I rely on Your energy to arrest this demoralizing traffic, and trust that You will be able to do it. When You find cotton in the swamps being evidently moved for the purpose of trade with the enemy and evading our picket-lines, burn it and destroy the boats if You have no use for them, and arrest and keep under close guard all engaged in the business until You can send them to my headquarters with a statement of the facts in their case. Do not permit Your pickets to remain too long at one post, as they may be corrupted, and You had better see that in each picket are one or two men of different commands and reliable, and by frequent changes You will baffle these speculators. I earnestly recommend You to frequently visit and remain at Your picket-posts a little time, and by inquiry among the citizens You may frequently obtain good and reliable information. If You think it proper consult with Lieutenant Scarborough about extending a line of pickets across all

80 R R-VOL XLVIII, PT II