War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1243 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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take some man from the United States to fill the place. Schofield, if he can get the start, is fully equal to the task. When Congress meets I have but little doubt but the Mexican question will be taken up and the withdrawal of all foreign troops insisted upon. If so, this will settle the whole question. In the meantime, all You can do is to encourage the Liberals to use their greatest exertions until they do get aid. If they give up themselves and, like Micawber, wait for something to turn up, they may lose everything. Some of Your letters received in my absence I have furnished copies of to the President. Your course and views are heartily concurred in by me, and I am satisfied they are also by the President and Secretary of War. Mr. Secretary of State I fear is working against the Liberal cause in Mexico. I hope I do him injustice in this matter.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., October 24, 1865. (Received 12. 10 p. m.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

General-in-Chief:

Is it expected that the United States furnish mounted escorts for the overland stages? Such service is enormously expensive, as it kills up both horses and men at a fearful rate, and requires very large force, more than the Government is willing to allow. With the sums appropriated to carry the mail, the company ought to be, and I think is, able to furnish enough men itself to accompany the coaches. If the military are to furnish mounted escorts, they had best carry the mails themselves. With one-fifth the amount paid to the mail company the military in this department can carry the mails regularly without additional expense to the Government. I would be glad to be informed whether I am required to furnish mounted escorts to the coaches. If so, it will need more troops than I have specified and a constant supply of horses. The stage company threatens to draw off their coaches and stock and stop carrying the mail unless I furnish the mounted escorts.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, October 24, 1865. (Received 7. 35 p. m.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

General-in-Chief:

General Curtis, of the Indian commission, telegraphs from Fort Sully as follows:

Chief of Minneconjous Sioux, for themselves and ten other tribes, met us here on 5th. They want peace and sign articles for themselves, and take copy for other tribes, including Cheyennes and Arapahoes, to sign. The Sioux and several other tribes have also come in. They all complain of our encroachments on their hunting grounds and our lines of emigration through their buffalo grounds, but they want peace. They say it is difficult, however, to restrain their young men, and our troops must therefore continue on the plains and be on the alert; but please notice any efforts of chiefs to present these papers if they emanate from this commission.

S. R. CURTIS.

The young men of the Cheyennes are committing some depredations on the Platte route on their way south.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.