War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1235 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

Nebraska, Dakota, Colorado, Utah, and Minnesota being composed of mixed troops, each equivalent to a brigade, are hereby designated as separate brigades.

By command of Major-General Pope:

JOS. McC. BELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, September 20, 1865. (Received 1. 25 p. m. 21st.)

General JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have directed the muster out of 3,000 men present for duty, or about 4,500 present and absent, of the Fourth Corps; also the muster out of three regiments of cavalry and the Fourth and Seventh Massachusetts Batteries. All these troops are in Texas, but this will not affect the threatening force. The War Department has ordered the muster out of all colored troops enlisted at the North belonging to the Twenty-fifth Corps, and mustering officer has been sent to execute the order. I will direct General Canby to muster out 2,000 white troops in his department, and he can spare 6,000 colored if authority is sent to me to muster them out. This will leave General Canby about 2,000 white troops of all arms and about 10,000 colored troops. I have also directed General Foster to muster out the Second Maine Cavalry in the Department of Florida.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

NEW ORLEANS, LA., September 21, 1865.

(Received 5. 30 p. m.)

Major General J. A. RAWLINS,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I respectfully report my return from Texas.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, September 21, 1865-2. 30 p. m.

(Received 10 a. m. 22nd.)

Lieutenant General U. S. GRANT,

Commanding Armies of the United States:

GENERAL: I have just returned from an extended trip in Texas, going from Galveston to San Antonio, thence to the Rio Grande and Fort Duncan, and returning via Austin City. I find the condition of affairs in Texas very good. Some depredations by small bands of the Kickapoo Indians in Western Texas. These Indians are located at Santa Rosa, in Mexico. I have decided not to establish any permanent posts with volunteer troops. It would be an enormous expense to the Government, and no economy could be expected from officers or men. The Indian difficulties are trifling, and I can control them by sending small cavalry expeditions from San Antonio out west as far as the Rio Grande, to stay out fifteen or twenty days, their return alternating