War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1196 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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life and property in Texas caused many officers and men to cross the river. Others were compelled to do so, in order to obtain a living. I cannot think that General Sheridan's order is aimed at either of these two classes. For myself, I shall, whenever I think proper, return to the United States and cheerfully submit to the laws that may be in force, relying upon their justice for my protection.

With great respect, general, I remain, respectfully, Your obedient servant,

JAS. E. SLAUGHTER,

Late Brigadier-General, C. S. Provisional Army.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DISTRICT OF TEXAS,

Brownsville, August 2 [?], 1865.

Respectfully referred to headquarters Military Division of the Gulf, with the recommendation that General Slaughter be permitted to take the oath and go to his home in Virginia. Detectives are endeavoring to get information in regard to the cotton transactions which are alleged against him. If sufficient evidence against him to justify it should be obtained he might be arrested in the United States.

F. STEELE,

Major-General.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE GULF,

New Orleans, La., September 21, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded to the Secretary of War:

Unless otherwise ordered General Slaughter, as well as ll other officers and men lately of the so-called C. S. Army who violated the terms of surrender between General Canby and the commanding officer of the so-called Confederate forces in the Trans-Mississippi Department by leaving the United States and entering Mexico with or without their arms, then the property of the United States Government, will be arrested and tried by a military commission as soon as they enter this military division. General Slaughter is the officer who carried into Mexico and disposed of to the Imperialists at Matamoras a battery of artillery and other arms. I regard his conduct in breaking the terms of the Canby and Smith surrender and attempting to defraud the United States Government as most reprehensible.

P. H. SHERIDAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

[Third indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT,

October 12, 1865.

Returned to the Adjutant-General to inform General Sheridan his proposed action is approved.

By order of the Secretary of War:

THOS. T. ECKERT,

Acting Assistant Secretary of War.

FORT LEAVENWORTH, August 20, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel JOS. MCC. BELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

On the 15th instant General Sanborn me the chiefs and head men of the Apaches, Arapahoes, Comanches, and Kiowas at the mouth of