War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1184 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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so possessed with this belief, and their officers so heartily sympathize with them in it, that they are nearly altogether inefficient, and are deserting so rapidly as to threaten disintegration of the organized forces in this department. Matters will undoubtedly be much worse when the reduction I have ordered is made, which will leave only five infantry and two cavalry regiments on duty west of Fort Leavenworth. It is essential that early steps be taken to furnish this department with the five infantry and two cavalry regiments needed for the protection of the overland routes to New Mexico and Utah. These regiments should either be regiments of the regular Army or volunteer regiments enlisted since the conclusion of the war. It might be possible to organize out of the regiments now on duty in the department the number of regiments above designated, but men must be taken for the purpose from the whole number on duty by their own consent. It would be necessary to authorize five infantry and two cavalry regiments to be organized in the department, the officers to be appointed by the President-it is hoped generally joined the recommendation of the military commander of the division or department. In this way proper and suitable officers could be selected for the particular service to be done. Whatever may be determined on in the matter, some speedy steps should be taken, in view of the condition of feeling which now obtains. The only reliable troops we have are the U. S. Volunteers regiments, enlisted from rebel deserters and refugees, and even they cannot altogether escape the contagious feeling prevailing among the other regiments. I have the honor, therefore, to invite Your attention to the subject in time to prevent embarrassment and trouble. By October 15 the force in the department will be reduced to five infantry and two cavalry regiments, unless I am otherwise instructed. Your attention is asked to my letter of instructions on this subject to General Dodge, dated August 1, a copy of which was furnished for Your information during Your absence from the city.

I am, general, very respectfully, Your obedient servant,

JOHN POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

FORT KEARNY, August 15, 1865.

Major General JOHN POPE,

Saint Louis:

Arrived here to-day. Escort and train also arrived same time from Fort Leavenworth.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

[AUGUST 15, 1865. -For Dodge to Connor, relative to the reduction of forces on the plains, see Part I, p. 354.]

FORT KEARNY, August 15, 1865.

Captain GEORGE F. PRICE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Fort Laramie:

How many troops, all told, in General Connor's command, not counting Eleventh Kansas nor General Tibbits' brigade? How many of them for duty?

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.