War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1172 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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whatever with Indian tribes desiring peace, except a cessation of hostilities and arrangements of time and place for the Indians to meet properly appointed commissioners.

I am, sir, very respectfully, Your obedient servant,

JOHN POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

[AUGUST 8, 1865. -For Price to Dodge, relative to Indian operations on the plains, see Part I, p. 358.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE UPPER ARKANSAS,

In the Field, Fort Larned, Kans., August 8, 1865.

Major General JOHN POPE,

Commanding Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Your telegram of the 4th instant, which reached me at 11 p. m. yesterday. The command will go into camp near this post and I shall proceed to the mouth of the Little Arkansas and have an interview with the chiefs of the hostile tribes if possible.

I have the honor, &c.,

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE UPPER ARKANSAS,

In the Field, Fort Larned, Kans., August 8, 1865.

Colonel J. H. LEAVENWORTH,

U. S. Indian Agent, Mouth of the Little Arkansas:

COLONEL: I shall not cross the Arkansas until I shall have communicated with the hostile tribes by messenger, with a view of arranging for a council with their chiefs and head men to treat for a permanent peace and treaty. I shall leave here to-night or to-morrow morning for Your place, and will arrive there as soon as possible.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

JOHN B. SANBORN,

Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS NORTHWEST INDIAN EXPEDITION,

Camp Numbers 37, Fort Berthold, August 8, 1865.

ASST. ADJT. General, DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHWEST,

Milwaukee, Wis.:

SIR: I have the honor to report I reached this place at 8 a. m. and encamped three miles from the Fort. My last report was written from Devil's Lake. I marched from there to the Mouse River, baring north, till I came in sight of the frontier of the British Possessions, but at a long distance off. Owing to the great scarcity of water (that can be used) it is impossible to take very route You would wish. I passed quite a number of lakes, beautiful to look at, but containing water so strongly impregnated with alkali and other substances that it would about take the skin off Your lips to drink it. As it was, we had to make marches of twenty-eight or thirty miles, and in two days I reached