War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1044 Chapter LX. LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI.

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General Dodge. Send the order for Brevet Major-General Elliott to report to me to General Sheridan, with the request that he direct General Elliott to comply with the order. General Elliott is supposed to have gone to New Orleans or Red River with the Fourth Army Corps. I shall be here four or five days. Telegraph me anything of importance, addressed to care General Grant.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, July 3, 1865 - 1. 30 p. m.

Major-General PLEASONTON:

If General Dodge requires another pontoon train of canvas boats direct Bell to write to Colonel Merrill, Engineers, at Cincinnati, to send one.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE UPPER ARKANSAS,

Fort Riley, July 3, 1865.

Major General G. M. DODGE,

Commanding Department of the Missouri:

In reply to Your dispatch of the 1st instant I have the honor to state that I have no knowledge of the capture of Kitchen's train by the Indians. They made an attack upon it and captured some of the stock, but the troops nearly all. The train was escorted by New Mexico volunteers, commanded by Captain Felsenthal, First New Mexico Infantry. But few Indians are now north of the Arkansas. None have been seen for the last few days. The Kiowas, Comanches, and Apaches are down on Salt Plains and Red River.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAS. H. FORD,

Brevet Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE UPPER ARKANSAS,

Fort Riley, July 3, 1865.

Major General G. M. DODGE,

Commanding Department of the Missouri:

I have the honor to report for the information of the general commanding the following as regards the state of my district: The Thirteenth Missouri Cavalry, Fifteenth Kansas Cavalry, Second Colorado Cavalry, two companies of Third Wisconsin Cavalry, one company of Seventh Iowa Cavalry, and the greater portion of the Second and Fifth Regiments U. S. Volunteer Infantry are stationed along the Santa Fe road from Little Arkansas River on the east to Fort Dodge and Cimarron Crossing on the west. I can at any time send one or two expeditions south of the river (500 or 600 men each), but do not deem it best to send any south until Colonel Leavenworth can be heard again. He writes from the mouth of the Little Arkansas on the 27th ultimo that the hostile Indians held a great council near Fort Cobb, at which a Texan officer was present, who told them that the whites had made peace among themselves, and advised them to make peace with the whites. The southern Indians, Kiowas, Comanches, and Apaches, all gave in at once, and said they

would send out no more war parties north. The