War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 1010 Chapter LX. LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTH SUB-DISTRICT OF THE PLAINS,

Denver, Colo. Ter., June 27, 1865.

Captain GEORGE F. PRICE,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, District of the Plains,

Fort Laramie, Dak. Ter.:

I have the honor to report that about 140 Indians of the Arapaho tribe are encamped near Camp Collins. Their lodges are about three miles from the camp on the stage road. They say they came here for protection, and in consequence, besides that, they ask to be furnished with rations. I respectfully ask for instructions whether I am to order the quartermaster to furnish them with rations; and, if so, to what extent. It is my opinion that all the depredations that have been committed this side of the North Platte River have been done by this tribe of Indians. On account of the very few troops at Camp Collins, I think that the Indians ask for more than otherwise they would dare to. The arrival of the cavalry at that post from Fort Laramie I think will serve to keep them more quiet. From the information I receive from Lieutenant-Colonel Plumb I expect that the cavalry referred to will arrive at Camp Collins to-day.

Very respectfully, Your obedient servant,

C. H. POTTER,

Colonel Sixth U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS SOUTH SUB-DISTRICT OF THE PLAINS,

Denver City, Colo. Ter., June 27, 1865.

Captain GEORGE F. PRICE,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, District of the Plains,

Fort Laramie, Dak. Ter.:

I have the honor to report that I returned to my headquarters at Denver this a. m. I have issued such instructions to commanding officers at Fort Halleck and Fort Collins as will secure the safe transmittal of the mails along the stage route under my charge. Lieutenant-Colonel Plumb, from Fort Laramie, did not arrive at Fort Halleck until after my return from Sulphur Springs, the 24th instant, and then only with an escort of twelve men, two days' march in advance of his command. The necessary guards at the stations and escorts for the coaches are now placed between Fort Collins and Fort Halleck, with the exception of Park Station, the first station west of Fort Collins. The guard at this station will be placed on the arrival of troops from Fort Laramie. I do not anticipate any trouble now along the line, and by this time the guards and escorts are stationed beyond Fort Halleck nearly to the Green River, but beyond Sulphur Springs, seventy-five miles from Fort Halleck. Thus far no depredations have been committed by the Indians. On my arrival at Camp Collins, down the road, I found the post in very poor condition; the troops not well disciplined, and but very few in number, those ordered there from Fort Halleck not having arrived; but I am sure that with the instructions that I have issued, and the arrival at that post to-morrow evening of Major Norton, will place everything in proper shape, and that good military discipline will surely be enforced. I took through with me from Fort Halleck, with a Government team, all the mails that were there, one entire wagon load, and returned from Sulphur Springs with a mail of nearly the same amount returning east. I had no trouble with the Indians at all; and I ask leave to express my opinion that if