War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0984 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

Search Civil War Official Records

CONCORDIA, TEX., June 23, 1865.

COMMANDING OFFICER FORT SELDEN, N. MEX.:

SIR: A number of Navajo Indians have escaped from the reservation at Fort Sumner. It is reported that they intend going to the Chusca Valley (locality unknown). The general commanding desires they should be intercepted and captured or destroyed. If You have not already sent out a force for this object, You will send Lieutenant Oliphant, with a detachment of his company, with Juan Arroyo, to effect, if possible, the object desired with regard to these Indians. The details I leave to You, and suggest You advise with Your guide, Juan Arroyo. The people having flocks and herds at grazing camps should be informed, so far as possible, that they may prevent the same being stolen.

I am, very respectfully,

N. H. DAVIS,

Assistant Inspector-General, U. S. Army.

SAINT PAUL, MINN., June 23, 1865.

(Received 8. 40 a. m. 24th.)

Major-General POPE:

I would be glad to see General Sanborn command an immediate expedition against the Indians of Devil's Lake, Turtle Mountain, or vicinity.

S. MILLER,

Governor.

HEADQUARTERS POST COMMANDANT,

Fort Rice, Dak. Ter., June 23, 1865.

Captain M. NORTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Northwest Indian Expedition:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding, that Mr. Pervett arrived at this post from below, overland, on the 31st of May, 1865. He reported meeting at Cheyenne River and passing through a war party of eighty Yanktonnais and Two Kettle's band, who had just received their annuity goods at Fort sully. They told him they should not fight the whites, but were on their way to make war with Rees and Gros Ventres, at Fort Berthold. On the 22nd an Indian from Fort Berthold arrived at this post, and reports a war party, who said they were Yanktonnais and Two Kettle's band by their shouting, had attacked the Rees and Gros Ventres camp, stolen 70 horses and killed 2 Rees, and were fighting when he left. I send these as rumors. I have on official communication as yet.

Very truly, yours,

C. A. R. DIMON,

Colonel First U. S. Volunteer Infantry, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS NORTHWEST INDIAN EXPEDITION,

Camp 13, Dak. Ter., July 1, 1865.

Respectfully forwarded.

I suppose as these Indians are not allowed to fight the whites, it is necessary for them to fight somebody in order to keep up their habits and customs.

ALF. SULLY,

Brevet Major-General.