War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0933 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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possibly embarrass the future action of the Government. I take this occasion to assure Your Excellency of my hearty co-operation in Your efforts to re-establish civil government, and in any measures that may be undertaken for the benefit of the State or people of Louisiana. I shall be happy at all times to confer with You upon any of these subjects, and to give You, whenever necessary, any assistance that You may require.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, sir, Your obedient servant,

E. R. S. CANBY,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, June 19, 1865-12 m.

(Received 3 p. m.)

Major-General POPE,

Saint Louis, Mo.:

The cost of keeping the amount of cavalry called for on the prairies is so enormous I wish You would cut down the expeditions all You can and direct that animals be grazed as far as possible.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, June 19, 1865.

Lieutenant-General GRANT:

I will reduce cavalry expenses as far as possible and comply with Your orders about grazing. I think the Government will find it true economy to finish this Indian war this season so that it will stay finished. We have troops enough now on the plains to do it, and can do it now better than hereafter. If I could only get legislation or a determined resolution of the Government to do away with the present system of Indian policy everything would go right. I have exceeded my authority already in prohibiting intercourse between Indians and Indian agents, and shall maintain this prohibition until otherwise ordered.

JOHN POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., June 19, 1865.

Honorable JAMES HARLAN,

Secretary of the Interior, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to submit for Your consideration the inclosed letters and documents in relation to Indian affairs. I feel sure under the present administration of the Department of the Interior that all matters of grave interest to the public service and which properly come under the jurisdiction of that Department will be carefully considered and acted upon honestly and with fidelity to the public interests and to the character and reputation of the Government. A pursual of the inclosed papers will inform You of my views of the policy pursued hitherto toward the Indian tribes and its results-views which You will find concurred in by every army officers who has ever served on the frontier, beginning with the General-in-Chief of the Army. Whether these