War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0901 Chapter LX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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opinion there are more troops in this district than are needed. I would respectfully recommend a distribution of forces as follows, and that the remaining forces be held in reserve, subject to the orders of the brevet major-general commanding the District of Louisiana: At Washington, three companies Ninety-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry; at Opelousas, two companies Ninety-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry and company K, First Louisiana Cavalry, who can be supplied from New Orleans via the Atchafalaya and Bayou Courtableau for six weeks, when the water will fall and the only communication will be by land for some six months, consequently for these posts a six-month's supply is recommended; at Vermillionville, one company Third Rhode Island Cavalry and one of the Ninety-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry, who would be supplied from New Iberia; at New Iberia, one company Third Rhode Island Cavalry and two companies Ninety-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry, which can be supplied by the Teche at all seasons of the year; at Franklin, two companies Ninety-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry; at Brashear, the First Battalion, Eleventh U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery; at Bayou Boeuf and Tigerville, to protect the railroad, one company Seventy-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry, divided; at Bayou Des Allemands and Boutte, on the railroad, one company of the Seventy-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry, divided; at Terre Bonne and La Fourche Crossing, on the railroad, one company Seventy-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry, divided; at Terre Bonne and La Fourche Crossing, on the railroad, one company Seventy-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry, divided; two companies Seventy-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry and one company Third Rhode Island Cavalry at Thibodeaux, and the four remaining companies of the Seventy-eighth not disposed of to be held as a reserve at Thibodeaux, and the Fourth Iowa Battery, which has more than one year and a half to serve, reduced to a four-gun battery and held at Thibodeaux, and the Fourth Iowa Battery, which has more than one year and a half to serve, reduced to a four-gun battery and held at Thibodeaux as a reserve. Thibodeaux is supplied from Terre Bonne Station, on the railroad. At Donaldsonville, Company G, Tenth U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery; one company Seventy-eighth U. S. Colored Infantry, and one company Third Rhode Island Cavalry. Donaldsonville and Plaquemine are supplied by the river. This disposition I believe is necessary for the quiet of the country, the protection of the well disposed, and the enforcements of the laws for a time at least, but I do not believe more will be needed. It will leave for disposal the Seventy-fifth U. S. Colored Infantry, whose time expires in November; the Twenty-fifth New York Battery, whose time expires in December; Company A, Second Illinois Light Artillery, Company D, First Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, and eight companies of the Third Rhode Island Cavalry.

The condition of the country is one of great distress and destitution. The ravages of the caterpillar upon the cotton crop, the merciless seizing of forage and subsistence by the rebels, with the present overflow, leaves many without food, and nearly all in circumstances of distress. The paroled rebel soldiers appear inclined to be quiet, and many are asking to take the oath. The only think I find in any way embarrassing is the prejudice against colored soldiers, and a lingering hope still manifest among a few of the wealthy and educated, and consequently influential, for the return of slavery. There are some jayhawkers or guerrillas, but with a proper disposition of our forces, which I have suggested, and especially of the cavalry companies, we can soon hunt them down. There are no supplies which can be procured in the country at a less cost to the Government than from depot, except fresh beef and sugar, both of which I believe can be procured at Washington or New Iberia much cheaper than at New Orleans. Parties tell me that they