War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0854 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, Numbers 155.

New Orleans, La., June 11, 1865.

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5. Captain A. H. Jumper, Twenty-sixth Indiana Infantry, is hereby relieved from duty as provost-marshal, parish of Plaquemine, and will rejoin his regiment. Captain George W. Cole, Second Battalion, Eleventh U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery, is announced as provost-marshal of the parish of Plaquemine.

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By order of Major General E. R. S. Canby:

C. H. DYER,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SOUTHERN DIVISION OF LOUISIANA,

New Orleans, June 11, 1865.

Lieutenant Colonel CHARLES B. GASKILL,

Eighty-first U. S. Colored Infantry:

I am directed by the brevet major-general commanding to say that he has the pleasure to state that the condition of Your regiments is superior to almost any volunteer regiments he ever inspected, and in many important points it is equal to that of the best instructed regular troops. These important points are as follows: General cleanliness and care of arms and clothing, a life and spirit on the part of field and company officers in their personal movements and in the conveyance of their orders and commands, thus inspiring the rank and file with a high degree of interest in their duties and gaining their respect and confidence. The maneuvers, with but few exceptions, were made in that prompt, well-connected, and shoulder-to-shoulder manner that must have been pleasing to every soldier present. The general commanding congratulates the lieutenant-colonel upon his success in the training of his regiment, and hopes that it may be retained in service as an example around which may rally a large number of regiments of this description of troops.

I am, sir, respectfully, Your obedient servant,

WICKHAM HOFFMAN,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. NORTHERN DIV. OF LOUISIANA, Numbers 24.

Shreveport, La., June 11, 1865.

Great and sudden changes in the condition of any class of people are always productive of suffering, and the transition of the blacks from a state of slavery to freedom cannot fail to cause temporary suffering to all classes. Already this is being manifested by the negroes leaving their homes and setting out en masse for the military posts, and with no definite purpose except to leave the scene of their former bondage. The result of this state of things, if allowed, would be -

First. The loss of the crops and the entire ruin of the agricultural interests in this part of the State.

Second. Untold suffering, starvations, and misery among the blacks themselves.