War of the Rebellion: Serial 102 Page 0852 LOUISIANA AND THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI. Chapter LX.

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is just the sort of a man I would like to have under me in the field. The latest news from the upper country is May 30. The Sioux have gone on a hunt, but a large crowd will meet me at Pierre as soon as they hear I am coming up, and I don't think there will be much trouble with the majority of the Sioux, except a great deal of talk. I regret very much I have not some few presents to give to those chiefs who have proven themselves true friends to me. I would like to present them in the presence of the troublesome ones. The Cheyennes and others still trouble the garrison at Fort Rice. I feel sure the Platte Indians are on the Heart River, yet I may be mistaken. General Dodge will have a long march of it to overtake them if this is so. I hope the order to muster out troops that have to serve only till October 1 will be revoked. If it is not, I can do nothing. This is to be regretted, for the appearance of a respectable force, I think, might secure a lasting peace. A small force would invite an attack, which, although it might be resisted, could not punish. The consequence would be the warlike party of Sioux would have the ascendancy, and the work of the last two years in a measure lost. The last of my expedition left yesterday. I will not leave for a few days, as I can overtake them at Pierre with ease. You tell me to acknowledge Your letters. This I make it a rule to do, but there is great irregularity in the mails. I do not always acknowledge Your telegrams on account of expense. The officers and men are suffering very much for want of pay.

With much respect, Your obedient servant,

ALF. SULLY,

Brevet Major-General.

SIOUX CITY, June 10, 1865.

Major General J. POPE,

Saint Louis:

GENERAL: In case come of the Cheyennes or other Platte Indians should express a wish for peace on the condition that [they] should occupy the country north of the Big Cheyenne River and behave themselves, would it be well to grant it them? I shall no doubt have a great many questions of this sort to talk over with the Indians. Depredations near Fort Rice still continue. An officer was badly wounded nearly in sight of the Fort. The nature of the country back of the Fort is such - broken up with ravines and high hills - it affords a good hiding place for small parties. I would like authority, as I had last year, to take into service a small body of Indians, paying them the same as soldiers and giving them rewards for every scalp they bring in -say, $50 per scalp. I have Indians I know I can trust in this business, for I have so compromised them with their nation that it is to their interest to serve me.

With much respect, Your obedient servant,

ALF. SULLY,

Brevet Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE NORTHWEST,

Milwaukee, Wis., June 10, 1865.

Brevet Major-General SULLY,

In the Field:

GENERAL: Yours of the 3rd instant acknowledging the receipt of mine of the 25th ultimo, and expressing some apprehension that You